News Michelin Researching Eco-Friendly Wood-Based Tires

18:26  10 july  2018
18:26  10 july  2018 Source:   motor1.com

It’s Almost Time to Take Off Your Winter Tires

  It’s Almost Time to Take Off Your Winter Tires <p>We hear so much in Canada about how important it is to use winter tires during the colder months. What doesn’t come up as often is that it’s just as important to take them off when the weather gets warm again.</p>Maybe some people are trying to save money. Maybe they’re actually using all-weather tires, a relatively new product that’s not yet well-known. Or, maybe, spring came and went, and these poor hapless drivers just plain forgot.

Michelin , the French tire company, is moving toward using wood – and no, you won’t be able to cut down a tree and slap it onto your car axle. According to Motoring.com.au, the tire company is looking to replace key oil ingredients with wood - based ones.

Michelin Wood Tire . They’ re not what you think. Right now, the company is researching in Brazil. The company is setting up a plantation model that allows for the growing of bananas and cocoa alongside rubber.

Michelin Wood Tire © Motor1.com Michelin Wood Tire

They’re not what you think.

The future of the tire is all about sustainability, and that means moving away from using oil in tire production. Michelin, the French tire company, is moving toward using wood – and no, you won’t be able to cut down a tree and slap it onto your car axle. According to Motoring.com.au, the tire company is looking to replace key oil ingredients with wood-based ones.

The company is looking at wood chips replacing the oil-based elastomers – a polymer with the elastic properties of rubber – in the tire. Right now, 80 percent of the materials in tires come from oil. The company hopes to show the first wooden tire sometime in 2020.

Your Corner Wrench: Winter tires are no good for warmer weather

  Your Corner Wrench: Winter tires are no good for warmer weather Driving on your winter tires during warmer months isn't exactly a wise ideaCost. While you might be trying to save money by leaving snow tires on, it will actually cost you more in the long run. Winter tires, with their softer rubber compounds, will wear out substantially faster on warmer road surfaces than a traditional summer or “all-season” tire due to harder rubber compound.

Michelin , the French tire company, is moving toward using wood – and no, you won’t be able to cut down a tree and slap it onto your car axle. According to Motoring.com.au, the tire company is looking to replace key oil ingredients with wood - based ones.

Michelin , the French tire company, is moving toward using wood – and no, you won’t be able to cut down a tree and slap it onto your car axle. According to Motoring.com.au, the tire company is looking to replace key oil ingredients with wood - based ones.

Video: A Hoverboard for each foot (provided by Autoblog)

The move to wood ingredients brings other benefits other than weaning a company off oil. Trees grow everywhere, making it easy for the company to source the renewable materials locally.

“We have a project working with wood chips. We will use the waste from the wood industry to create elastomers that come into tires,” Michelin’s Cyrille Roget, the worldwide director of scientific and innovation communication told the publication. “We believe it is a good solution for the future.”

Right now, the company is researching in Brazil. The company is setting up a plantation model that allows for the growing of bananas and cocoa alongside rubber. The company is also looking at 3D printing tires, which is about 10 to 15 years down the road. However new technologies could change that timeline.

“We are working with it to develop rubber printing, or polymer printing,” Roget added. “We are more in the early stages of this technology. But it needs to be industrialized and ready for the future.”

You probably won’t notice when wood-based tires become a viable product shortly. They will offer the same performance while being better for the environment all around – which sounds like a win-win situation for everyone.

How the Hunt for a New Car has Changed .
Going from dealership to dealership is no longer the norm . Today, because of the transformative power of the internet and the popularity of smartphones, the car-buying journey looks much different. We have moved from ‘kicking tires’ in the showroom to ‘clicking tires’ online.Research your next car on MSN AutosTo illustrate a modern car-buying journey, in 2016 Google released a study called The Car-Buying Process: One Consumer’s 900+ Digital Interactions.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
This is interesting!