Ownership Here’s Why Car Windows Have Those Little Black Dots

18:06  31 january  2018
18:06  31 january  2018 Source:   Reader's Digest.CA

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For another fun fact about cars , learn why opening your car door like this just might save your life. [Source: Jalopnik.com]. Zlatko Guzmic/Shutterstock You probably haven’t given much thought to the pattern of little black dots on the edges of car and bus windows .

Recently, while looking at the vibrant lights of Hong Kong through a bus window , I noticed for the eleven-millionth time those little dots and that black band running along the edge of the glass. Here ’ s The Real Story The Mainstream Media Won’t Touch.

a close up of a road: Image© Reader's Digest Image Photo: ShutterStock

Ever wondered what those black dots on windshields and windows were for?

You probably haven’t given much thought to the pattern of little black dots on the edges of car and bus windows. Sure, they look cool, but do they do anything?

Research

Research

Thanks to Jalopnik.com, we learned that those black dots on windshields and windows, and the black rims that surround them, do have a reason for being there (other than decoration). It has to do with how car windows are made--from the 1950s and ’60s onward, car manufacturers started to use an adhesive to hold car windows in place, rather than metal trim. This adhesive got the job done, but it wasn’t very aesthetically pleasing. Enter the black rims that you see around car windows, called “frits.” The frits (and the dots that border them) are made from ceramic paint. The frits are there to hide the rather icky-looking, but very important, adhesive from view. Also, since these painted rims are baked--yes, baked--into the window, they are all but indestructible. They hold the glue in place, which in turn holds the windows in place.

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Originally published as Here ’ s Why Car Windows Have Those Little Black Dots on ReadersDigest.com.

You probably haven’t given much thought to the pattern of little black dots on the edges of car and bus windows . Sure, they look cool. Peanuts Aren’t Actually Nuts, Here ’ s Why . COOL OMG.

As for the dots, they are there to make an aesthetically pleasing transition from the thick black lines to the transparency of the window. The dots aren’t randomly placed; they are positioned in what’s known as a “halftone pattern,” getting smaller and farther apart as the black recedes. This pattern is less jarring to the eye than opaque black paint juxtaposed with transparent glass. However, even the dots aren’t just there for decoration. Their other purpose, besides the visual effect, is to provide temperature control. To get the glass of windows and windshields to be bent the way it is, the glass is heated up. The black-painted glass heats up faster than the rest of the window. The dots are there to distribute the heat a little more evenly, which prevents the windshield from warping in the heat.

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Enter the black rims that you see around car windows , called “frits.” The frits (and the dots that border them) are made from ceramic paint. [Source: Jalopnik.com]. Originally published as Here ’ s Why Car Windows Have Those Little Black Dots on ReadersDigest.com.

You have probably never thought about those little black dots on the edges of car windows . Sure, they look rather stylish, but what are they really for? Zlatko Guzmic / Shutterstock.com.

So, now you know! For another fun fact about cars, learn why opening your car door like this just might save your life.

[Source: Jalopnik.com]

Originally published as Here’s Why Car Windows Have Those Little Black Dots on ReadersDigest.com.

The post Here’s Why Car Windows Have Those Little Black Dots appeared first on Reader's Digest.

How to Defrost Your Windshield in Less Than One Minute .
Photo: Shutterstock How to Defrost Your Windshield in No Time One of the most dreaded tasks of the cold winter months is waiting for your windshield to defrost. Blasting the defrost can take time and wastes gas; and using a scraper isn't always effective, requires a lot of muscle, and can lead to frozen hands. (Warm up your car interior with the help of these super-cool automotive accessories.) This easy-to-make solution can clear your windshield in less than a minute and get you on the road fast. Simply mix 1/3 part water and 2/3 part isopropyl or rubbing alcohol. Pour the solution into a spray bottle and in the morning, spray it on your windshield. The ice will disappear instantly. You can also spray the solution on your car handles and doors if they are frozen shut. Still keep your scraper handy, though, as you may need to scrape off some excess chunks of ice. (This is why your car window has those little black dots.) This works because isopropyl doesn't freeze until it reaches 128?F below 0. Therefore, you can also keep the spray bottle in your car without worrying about it freezing over night. (However, beware of leaving these nine items in your car!) Another thing to note: Make sure that you continue to wash and wax your car on a regular basis if you spray the solution on a part of your car that is painted. Even though the solution doesn't directly touch the paint, if used often, it could cause it to erode. ((Here's how the colour of your car affects your chances of getting into an accident.) Try these other ways to use rubbing alcohol around the home! Originally published as How to Defrost Your Windshield in Less Than One Minute on ReadersDigest.com. The post How to Defrost Your Windshield in Less Than One Minute appeared first on Reader's Digest.

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