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Research How to Avoid a Flood-Damaged Vehicle when Buying Pre-owned

19:21  10 november  2017
19:21  10 november  2017 Source:   wheels.ca

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One of the consequences of the recent hurricanes in the U.S. is the potential for a Flood - Damaged Vehicle to wind up in Ontario. 0 SHARES. The Ontario Motor Vehicle Industry Council (OMVIC) has issued an alert to consumers who are in the market to buy a pre - owned vehicle .

The problem with a flood - damaged vehicle is that water damage is not always visible until months, or years, after the fact. When water gets into sensitive electronic systems or safety components, it CarProof reports are available on most pre - owned vehicles directly from dealerships’ websites.

The Ontario Motor Vehicle Industry Council (OMVIC) has issued an alert to consumers who are in the market to buy a pre-owned vehicle.

One of the consequences of the recent hurricanes in the U.S. is the potential for flood-damaged automobiles to wind up in Ontario and to be purchased by unsuspecting consumers.

This isn’t a new trend; it happened after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and again after Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Video: Half a million vehicles destroyed by Hurricane Harvey (provided by Autoblog)

The problem with a flood-damaged vehicle is that water damage is not always visible until months, or years, after the fact. When water gets into sensitive electronic systems or safety components, it could cause corrosion and lead to vehicle malfunctions. This could compromise a vehicle’s safety and put drivers and passengers in jeopardy.

Why Flooded-Out Cars Are Likely Total Losses

  Why Flooded-Out Cars Are Likely Total Losses Auto owners whose vehicles were swept up by Hurricane Harvey are facing two hard facts right now: Their car is almost certainly totaled, if it was swamped, and they'll get no money back if they d on't have comprehensive insurance, experts say.“All we know now is that there are thousands of submerged vehicles,” says Mark Hanna, spokesman for the Insurance Council of Texas. “Many owners are covered with comprehensive insurance, but there are many without it.”In Texas, he says, 15 percent of motorists have no car insurance, and of those who do, 75 percent have comprehensive insurance.

"We want everyone to always be prepared and be aware because buying a flood - damaged car can cost a fortune in repairs," Freis said. How to avoid flood - damaged vehicles . Hanna said there are many indicators to look for when a vehicle has water-damage, and potential pre - owned automobile

Knowing how to identify flood damage on any vehicle is essential when buying a used car. Nothing is more lethal to a car's integrity than untreated water damage. There are certain precautions you can take to avoid buying a flood damaged vehicle .

Many of the vehicles severely affected by the U.S. storms will be covered by insurance, but some of those vehicles will be uninsured. According to OMVIC, some of these uninsured vehicles could be “dried out, cleaned up and sold off by unscrupulous sellers without recording that history on any documents.”

These vehicles could be given clean titles, and the flood damage would not show up on a history report.

It is possible that flood-damaged vehicles could trickle into Ontario over the next few years. Those who import and sell these vehicles are referred to as ‘curbsiders,’ people to misrepresent themselves and the vehicles they are selling for their own gain.

Fortunately, there are steps consumers can take to eliminate the risk of buying a flood-damaged vehicle, the most important of which is to purchase from an OMVIC-registered dealer.

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You don't want to buy a flood damaged vehicle . But it isn't always easy to tell, and there are some unscrupulous resellers who will try and palm off a flood car on you if you aren't careful. Here is how it works: When vehicles are totaled

Learn how to avoid buying a flood - damaged auto! Yet, flood damage can be difficult to identify. Moreover, vehicle buyers may not look for flood damage if no recent floods have occurred in their area. Suppose that your company owns a small pickup truck.

Dealers are lawfully required to disclose if a vehicle has been branded:

1) Irreparable, salvage or rebuilt;

2) If a vehicle has been declared a total loss;

3) If a vehicle has been registered in another jurisdiction, and if so, where;

4) And, if a vehicle “sustained any damage caused by ‘immersion in liquid that has penetrated to the level of at least the interior floorboards.’

Surprisingly, no such laws require private sellers to disclose this information.

When a vehicle is assigned ‘irreparable’ status in Ontario, it may not be licensed and can only be used for scrap or parts. Such a vehicle poses a health and safety risk to the driver, passengers and other motorists.

There are benefits when you buy from an OMVIC-registered dealer: They thoroughly research all vehicles acquired through trades or at auctions, and they pay into a compensation fund for consumers who have suffered a financial loss as a result of a transaction with a registered dealer.

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How will flooding damage a vehicle ? When car shopping, what are some visible signs of flood damage to watch for? What other measures can car shoppers use to avoid purchasing a flood - damaged car?

Auto News How to Avoid Purchasing a Flood - Damaged Vehicle . Buying a used vehicle is always risky. Even if it’s certified, inspected and under warranty there’s no telling how the previous owner (or owners) treated it.

With registered dealers, consumers enjoy a level of protection that is simply not available when they buy privately.

CarProof is Canada’s leading provider of comprehensive vehicle history reports to consumers and is endorsed by the Trillium Automobile Dealers Association. CarProof reports are available on most pre-owned vehicles directly from dealerships’ websites.

Whether you buy a used vehicle privately or from a registered dealer, there are steps you can take to minimize the risk of buying a vehicle that has earned “irreparable” status.

∙ Inspect a vehicle in daylight;

∙ Look for obvious signs of water damage, such as mould, mildew, and sand under the carpets, trunk mat or behind the dashboard;

∙ Test the major components, such as the radio, windshield wipers, turn signals, headlights, and heating and air-conditioning systems;

∙ Check for damp or musty odours;

∙ Check under the hood and carpets for mud and/or silt waterlines;

∙ Look for rusting on screwheads or on out-of-the-way panels;

∙ View the service records of the vehicle;

∙ Road test the vehicle at different speeds. Any major deficiencies will be more apparent during a test drive.

Thousands of Hurricane-Damaged Cars and Trucks Heading Back to Market

  Thousands of Hurricane-Damaged Cars and Trucks Heading Back to Market Thousands of Hurricane-Damaged Cars and Trucks Heading Back to Market Almost half a million cars and trucks that were damaged in Hurricane Harvey and have since been sitting in impromptu holding lots are set to head back out onto the roads or into scrap yards with salvage titles. And thousands more that were uninsured are out in the wild and could be headed anywhere, with no information stating they've been in a flood.

Used. New. Certified Pre - Owned . Here’s how you can avoid accidentally purchasing a flood - damaged vehicle . Get a Vehicle History Report. No matter where you choose to buy a car, you can still get some assurances that you’re not buying one that’s been flood - damaged .

With thousands of cars damaged in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the used car market may soon see some of those vehicles sold in Canada.

Remember: If the deal seems too good to be true, it likely is. When in doubt, ask a friend or someone who knows cars to assist you.

This column represents the views and values of the TADA. Write to president@tada.ca or go to tada.ca. Larry Lantz is president of the Trillium Automobile Dealers Association and is a new-car dealer in Hanover, Ont.

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