Family Mother races against time to fund research trial for son's fatal disease

19:50  26 october  2017
19:50  26 october  2017 Source:   TODAY

These Are the Real Facts About Eating Disorders

  These Are the Real Facts About Eating Disorders They can be fatal, and they come in all shapes, sizes and genders. When you think about a person with an eating disorder, whom do you picture? At least 10 percent of people diagnosed with an eating disorder are men and boys, and this number is probably an underestimate, as often boys and men are not screened for eating disorders and tend to under-report symptoms. Also, often surprising to many people is the fact that the highest prevalence of bulimia nervosa is among Hispanics, regardless of their level of income. Finally, eating disorders occur among people of all weights and sizes.

Family of 10-Year-Old Boy with Deadly Disease Races Against Time to Fund Trial for Other Kids: ‘We’re Not Giving Up’. Case Hogan of Nashville, Tennessee, has Hunter’ s syndrome, a rare and fatal genetic disorder that affects 400-500 people (mostly males) in the U. S . Most children are diagnosed

blog 'chrispeterson.blogdetik.com' is not exists. Portfolios for Professional Development: A Research Journey eBook.

When Melissa Hogan's son Case was 2, doctors diagnosed him with Hunter syndrome, a rare genetic disease with a terrible prognosis: children with Hunter syndrome gradually lose the ability to walk, talk and eat, and most die by their teen years. There is no cure.

At least, not yet. Hogan's shock soon turned into determination: she promised herself she would find a cure.

"I was totally devastated," she told TODAY. "I am very methodical and data driven. I approached it like everything, with research."

a close up of a person holding a baby: Like most boys born with Hunter syndrome, Case Hogan was born without symptoms and developed like any other child until he was 2. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Like most boys born with Hunter syndrome, Case Hogan was born without symptoms and developed like any other child until he was 2.

Hogan was a lawyer, not a doctor or a professional fundraiser. Hunter syndrome is what's known as an "orphan disease" — it's so rare that not much research is devoted to it.

A New Drug Might Lower Your Risk For Heart Attacks

  A New Drug Might Lower Your Risk For Heart Attacks While it's not yet known exactly what role inflammation plays in heart disease, it's common amongst heart disease patients — and a new study could shed light on what lowering inflammation can do to prevent heart attacks. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that a drug that lowered inflammation levels without affecting cholesterol could also lower a person's risk for heart attacks.For the study, 10,000 participants who had previously suffered heart attacks were randomly divided into two groups.

Fatal error: Call to undefined function wp() in /var/www/admin/data/www/needforspeak.pro/wp-blog-header.php on line 16.

ERROR: Couldn't find template for class = _angleart and category = AGGREGATION.

This orphan disease got a mother. Hogan kept detailed spreadsheets listing Hunter syndrome research projects, their funding needs, and their likelihood at making a real difference. She founded a nonprofit, Project Alive, to fund a cure. After several years of searching, she discovered one gene therapy that may have the potential to treat and possibly cure Hunter syndrome.

"What we hope conservatively is to stabilize kids at the level they are at now," she said. "We feel like if they are given the treatment early enough … they would not even develop the effects of the disease."

Hogan's son Chase can't participate in the trial she's raising money for, because he's already in another research trial. But she isn't slowing down.

Project Alive is raising money to develop and manufacture the vector, the mechanism that helps the gene therapy get into cells. The organization has raised $650,000 of the $1.5 million needed for this step, which is essential to take it to clinical trails. Hogan hopes people will donate as Project Alive faces a funding deadline next week.

The Scientific Reason Why Butter Could Be Healthier Than You Thought

  The Scientific Reason Why Butter Could Be Healthier Than You Thought Start spreading the news: Butter is the new broccoli! Well, not really. Using nine papers that included more than 600,000 people, researchers analyzed the connections between participants’ butter consumption and their risk for chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes.

Fatal error: require(): Failed opening required '/homepages/41/d538120149/htdocs/wp-blog-header.php' (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php5.4') in /homepages/41/d538120149/htdocs/index.php on line 17.

blog 'tracyritter.blogdetik.com' is not exists. The trial of Jesus : The Jewish and Roman proceedings against Jesus Christ

"It seems so easy to save kids' lives and we just want to believe that people want to do that," Hogan said.

Only 500 children in the United States and 2,000 worldwide have Hunter syndrome, overwhelmingly boys although a few girls have it also. Children with it lack an enzyme that helps the body clear itself of cellular waste. There's no cure and most with Hunter syndrome die in their teens from respiratory or heart problems.

"That, for me, personally was the hardest part … watching Case deteriorate and burying him at 12, 13, years old," she said. "We can accept physical challenges, the cognitive challenges, but the idea of him disappearing and dying is just horrific."

a young boy wearing a hat and smiling at the camera: Despite living with a life-limiting orphan disease, Case Hogan is full of life and loves playing basketball and tag. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Despite living with a life-limiting orphan disease, Case Hogan is full of life and loves playing basketball and tag.

At 2, Case started experiencing constant runny noses, ear infections, and fell a lot. At the same time his facial features gradually began changing and his development slowed. But these symptoms were so subtle that Hogan gave them little thought. But her mom, Jane Hancock, did.

The Size Of This Body Part Is Linked To Your Death

  The Size Of This Body Part Is Linked To Your Death Doctors took measurements of two body parts in older patients and found that when one of them was bigger, those people were less likely to die of heart disease.A study in the American Journal of Cardiology looked at the upper arms of almost 600 older adults with cardiovascular disease and found a link between their circumferences — the distances around them — and survival rates.

blog 'tracygulley.blogdetik.com' is not exists. The Race Against the Mammoth Car [SPEED RACER #04 RACE AGAINST

blog 'michaelsylvester.blogdetik.com' is not exists. Soviet Medicine in the Fight Against Mental Diseases epub pdf txt.

"My mom actually diagnosed him," Hogan said.

Hancock, a registered nurse, was watching a TV show about a boy with Hunter syndrome and realized Case experienced the same symptoms. After she told her daughter, Hogan researched it and knew her mom was right.

"It's pretty miraculous that my mom saw that," Hogan said. "He wouldn't have been diagnosed without it."

a person sitting on a chair: While Case leads an active life even though he has a life-limiting illness, he needs to receive monthly injections that keep his Hunter syndrome from progressing. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC While Case leads an active life even though he has a life-limiting illness, he needs to receive monthly injections that keep his Hunter syndrome from progressing.

While this led to early diagnosis, Case's future sounded bleak. There was no treatment and it was always fatal. But Hogan didn't give up.

"It really consumed my whole life. I probably wasn't a great parent at that time but we were trying to save our kid," she said.

She took Case to North Carolina to enroll him in a clinical trial. The study rejected Case because he wasn't sick enough.

"They needed a child who was declining to see if it worked," she said.

Frustrated, the family returned home to Nashville, Tennessee, and watched Case worsen.

Study Reveals Potential New Warning Sign Of Parkinson's

  Study Reveals Potential New Warning Sign Of Parkinson's Restless sleep may tip off Parkinson's disease later in life.A new study from researchers at a Danish University linked restless sleep and neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s and Dementia.

blog 'sharongrabow.blogdetik.com' is not exists. Against the Hypothesis of the End of Privacy: An

Fatal error: Not open query. Statement error: SELECT n.*, n.title_en AS title, a.linkname AS authorLinkname, CONCAT_WS(' ', a.name_en, a.lastname_en) AS authorName FROM core_news n LEFT JOIN core_author a ON a.id = n.author WHERE n.active = 'y' AND () AND n.id !=

"He lost 18 IQ points when he was 3. It was a devastating decline. We watched him going from nine-word sentences to heavily stuttering to three-word replies and one word," she said.

a group of people posing for the camera: Case Hogan loves playing with his brothers and school friends. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC Case Hogan loves playing with his brothers and school friends.

The North Carolina trial eventually accepted Case and the treatment seems to have stabilized his health. Now 10, Case loves playing basketball and tag and enjoys making friends at school. But the Hogans don't know whether it will extend his life.

Even though Case qualified for the trial, others did not. Hogan couldn't live knowing that other children wouldn't have the same chance as Case.

"That is why we started the gene therapy research," she said.

a person posing for the camera: When Melissa Hogan learned her son had Hunter syndrome she worked tirelessly to get him the care he needed. She founded a nonprofit to fund research to cure the disorder, which is considered an orphan disease because it's so rare. © Provided by NBCU News Group, a division of NBCUniversal Media LLC When Melissa Hogan learned her son had Hunter syndrome she worked tirelessly to get him the care he needed. She founded a nonprofit to fund research to cure the disorder, which is considered an orphan disease because it's so rare.

Hogan had learned that researchers had found a gene therapy for Sanfilippo syndrome, a sister disease of Hunter syndrome. She felt convinced that gene therapy could help children with Hunter syndrome and dedicated Project Alive efforts toward gene therapy. Suddenly, a remedy seemed real.

"Gene therapy has the potential to be a one-and-done cure," Hogan said. "If this works as expected, this would allow them to make the enzymes on their own."

The researchers need $2.5 million, total, to take their research from clinical trials to a treatment. While raising that much money can seem overwhelming, Hogan and other parents like her are determined to do whatever it takes.

"Cures are really possible," she said.

Got $130K? You could dive the Titanic .
Got $130K? You could dive the TitanicST. JOHN'S, N.L.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!