Health How Grandmothers Raised $27 Million To Fight AIDS — And Helped Cut Death Rates In Half

08:51  13 november  2017
08:51  13 november  2017 Source:   chatelaine.com

After Couples Fight, Men And Women Want Different Things To Make Up

  After Couples Fight, Men And Women Want Different Things To Make Up What do you do after you have a big fight with your partner? Do you not speak for days before finally giving in and apologizing? Do you make your partner grovel and beg? Do you not speak for days before finally giving in and apologizing? Do you make your partner grovel and beg? Or do you have hot make up sex?

Since 2006, granny groups across Canada have raised $ 27 million for African grandmothers , who determine what the money will support, whether that’s counselling, treatment for children, or tackling stigma. Their efforts have been part of the fight that has brought the death rate from HIV- AIDS in

How Grandmothers Raised $ 27 Million To Fight AIDS — And Helped Cut Death Rates In Half . A new book from the Stephen Lewis Foundation celebrates the huge difference grandmothers in Africa and Canada have made in saving lives.

Evelyne in Uganda_Photo by Alexis MacDonald: Evelyne Bakenyaga is a grandmother from Uganda. Photo, Alexis MacDonald.© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Evelyne Bakenyaga is a grandmother from Uganda. Photo, Alexis MacDonald.

In 2006, the annual number of AIDS-related deaths in eastern and southern Africa — the 21 countries most affected by the epidemic, including South Africa, Uganda and Kenya — peaked at 1.1 million. That same year, the Stephen Lewis Foundation asked 100 grandmothers from 11 African countries to lead the conversation at the International AIDS Conference, which was being held in Toronto. While grandmothers were at the forefront of the fight to prevent new infections, advocate for access to treatment and take care of those left behind, they had been largely absent from the global conversation about how to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS — the donor community believed they weren’t a worthwhile investment. “They said, ‘it’s not sustainable, they won’t be alive much longer,’” says Ilana Landberg-Lewis, executive director of the foundation.

The Size Of This Body Part Is Linked To Your Death

  The Size Of This Body Part Is Linked To Your Death Doctors took measurements of two body parts in older patients and found that when one of them was bigger, those people were less likely to die of heart disease.A study in the American Journal of Cardiology looked at the upper arms of almost 600 older adults with cardiovascular disease and found a link between their circumferences — the distances around them — and survival rates.

Tue 14 Feb 2017 05.00 EST Last modified on Tue 28 Nov 2017 00. 27 EST. Trump's 'global gag' aid rule endangers millions of women and children, Bill Gates warns. It brought its death rate down by a third between 2008 and 2015.

The president’s proposed budget includes a 6 million cut in the C.D.C.’s funding for H.I.V./ AIDS Despite the higher H.I.V. diagnosis and death rates in the Deep South, the region received 0 Sometimes when he closes his eyes, he said, he still sees the smiling, fit and slender 27 -year-old.

The foundation connected the African grandmothers with 200 of their Canadian cohorts, and the Grandmothers to Grandmothers movement was born. Since 2006, granny groups across Canada have raised $27 million for African grandmothers, who determine what the money will support, whether that’s counselling, treatment for children, or tackling stigma. Their efforts have been part of the fight that has brought the death rate from HIV-AIDS in eastern and southern Africa down by more than half.

To celebrate these women, Landsberg-Lewis has co-authored a book with Joanna Henry called Powered By Love, edited by Michelle Landsberg. Seventeen grandmothers from Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Swaziland, Uganda are in Canada this month promoting the book across the country. Eunice Mangwane is one of them.

Study suggests women less likely to get CPR from bystanders

  Study suggests women less likely to get CPR from bystanders ANAHEIM, Calif. - Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 per cent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 per cent of men, and men were 23 per cent more likely to survive, the study found. It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus professional responders.

Around 27 -28 percent of all children in developing countries are estimated to be underweight or stunted. An estimated 40 million people are living with HIV/ AIDS , with 3 million deaths in 2004. The loss of 443 million school days each year from water-related illness. Close to half of all people in

Of the 56.9 million deaths worldwide in 2016, more than half (54%) were due to the top 10 causes. The death rate from diarrhoeal diseases decreased by almost 1 million between 2000 and 2016 HIV/ AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death , having killed 1.0 million people in

Eunice Mangwane: Mangwane speaks while supported by Ugandan grandmother Mariam Mulindwa. Photo, Alexis MacDonald.© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Mangwane speaks while supported by Ugandan grandmother Mariam Mulindwa. Photo, Alexis MacDonald.

“HIV is fine when you stand there on stage and talk about [acceptance and testing], but when it knocks on your door, you speak another language — denial,” Mangwane told Chatelaine in October, while in Toronto on tour launching the book.

Mangwane has been working as an HIV/AIDs educator and counsellor on the southeastern coast of South Africa for the past 17 years. When she started the job, she faced constant resistance to her gospel of prevention. “Our people are not dying because of HIV, they are dying because they are not doing their rituals, and their ancestors are cross with them,” she recalls hearing.

Then the disease knocked on her door. Her adult daughter Judith, who lived with her, started to rapidly lose weight, and a colleague suggested Mangwane get her tested. Judith was HIV-positive. Mangwane started noticing abscesses on Judith’s toddler — he was also HIV-positive.

Why Are Women Still Being Left Behind In The Fight Against HIV?

  Why Are Women Still Being Left Behind In The Fight Against HIV? It has taken around 30 years but finally, we have an effective method of reducing the numbers of people contracting HIV. T he multi-pronged approach works; frequent testing, good adherence to medication, being undetectable, PEP and PrEP.The only jarring thing about this drop is that, principally, it is being seen in young (25 to 34-year-old), white, gay men.

Rich countries have cut deaths and injuries caused by crashes. And aid donors have pledged 0m to fight HIV/ AIDS , tuberculosis and malaria in the country in the next few years, and billion globally. Each week, over one million subscribers trust us to help them make sense of the world.

All death rates are with respect to the population in 1941. In 1946 Chattopadhyay estimated that 2 . 7 million had died in 1943 and the first half of 1944.[6] See Maharatna (1996, pp. 214–231) " How Sen's Theory Can Cause Famines" (PDF). Agricultural Economics Society Conference.

“I didn’t know how I was going to face the community,” says Mangwane.

At the time, she was helping promote a massive multimedia altarpiece art project built to remember those who had lost their lives to AIDS. The day the project was unveiled, Mangwane decided to share what was happening in her own family. The project toured Chicago, L.A. and Toronto, which is how she discovered the movement her fellow grandmothers were building.

“When I left Toronto after 2006, I decided that I’m going to start campaigning for grandmothers,” said Mangwane. “If I’m an educator and I can be in denial how much [harder] would it be for [someone] who knows nothing.”

This Simple Trick Can Cut Your Airfare Prices in Half .
When <g class="gr_ gr_9 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling multiReplace" id="9" data-gr-id="9">traveling</g> on a budget, every dollar counts. Unfortunately, the cost of airfare alone can burn a serious hole in your wallet. Don’t let that stop you from taking your dream vacation, though.&nbsp;When traveling on a budget, every dollar counts. Unfortunately, the cost of airfare alone can burn a serious hole in your wallet. Don’t let that stop you from taking your dream vacation, though. According to Jeff Klee, CEO of CheapAir, there is a 'sweet spot' to getting the biggest bang for your buck.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!