Health Why Are Women Still Being Left Behind In The Fight Against HIV?

18:07  04 december  2017
18:07  04 december  2017 Source:   Refinery29

After Couples Fight, Men And Women Want Different Things To Make Up

  After Couples Fight, Men And Women Want Different Things To Make Up What do you do after you have a big fight with your partner? Do you not speak for days before finally giving in and apologizing? Do you make your partner grovel and beg? Do you not speak for days before finally giving in and apologizing? Do you make your partner grovel and beg? Or do you have hot make up sex?

10 June 2015 – Despite considerable advances made in the global response to the AIDS epidemic over the last several decades, young women and adolescent girls in Africa “ are still being left behind ,” according to a new joint report from the United Nations and the African Union.

This Black Woman Is South Africa’s Most Powerful Leader In The Fight Against HIV /AIDS. She was the was sole breadwinner for her sick mother and the eight children in their home. MUST READ: HIV Is No Longer A Death Sentence, But Most Of Us Still Don’t Understand It.

Across five London GUM clinics there has been a recent, startling drop of around 40% in the number of new cases of HIV infection; this has been described as remarkable, with Public Health England rightly stating that this is the first major downturn in the HIV epidemic among gay men in England.

And it is remarkable – it has taken around 30 years but finally, we have an effective method of reducing the numbers of people contracting HIV. The multi-pronged approach works; frequent testing, good adherence to medication, being undetectable, PEP and PrEP.

Why, As Adult Women, Are We Getting Acne, Pimples And Zits?

  Why, As Adult Women, Are We Getting Acne, Pimples And Zits? illustration credit: shutterstock We're full grown women, so we why do we get acne!? Wrinkles and acne advice: Adult acne can rear its ugly head at any time, even if you were lucky enough to escape adolescent acne. In Western cultures, acne affects up to 95 per cent of adolescents and persists in up to 12 per cent of women and three percent of men. It can be very frustrating - and even devastating for some people. Pimple triggers for those of us adulting Hormones, diet and stress play a vital role in exacerbating acne. Other triggers can be linked to your menstrual cycle, excess production of testosterone and even polycystic ovary syndrome in severe or resistant cases. If you've recently stopped taking the birth control pill, you may notice an increase in acne. There are some studies that suggest that milk has a negative impact as well. One of the key things to remember when treating adult acne is that mature skin is different from adolescent skin. Adult skin produces less oil, has a slower rate of cellular turnover and may not heal as quickly. Adult acne tends to be chronic and low grade, with closed comedones being the most common type of lesion. A few papulopustules are usually present as well. In adults, rosacea may present with pustules and be mistaken for adult acne. Other signs and symptoms, such as redness of the skin, should alert the practitioner to consider rosacea in a different diagnosis.

"This is why we ' re leaning more and more on NGOs. Stigmatization of ill people is still a reality in Cameroon. The burden falls heaviest on women since men rarely get tested. In some Muslim communities in the north, HIV -positive women are chased from their homes.

"This is why we ' re leaning more and more on NGOs. They will soon have the ability to dispense antiretroviral treatment My life is ruined Stigmatization of ill people is still a reality in Cameroon. In some Muslim communities in the north, HIV -positive women are chased from their homes.

The only jarring thing about this drop is that, principally, it is being seen in young (25 to 34-year-old), white, gay men. Not jarring because young, white, gay men shouldn't get all the support that they are, and that they need – we know from all the data available that HIV has disproportionately impacted the gay community more than any other in this country – but jarring because rates of infection have remained static in all other groups, including women and heterosexual men.

a red rock: Refinery29 © Provided by Refinery29 Inc. Refinery29

On many levels it feels sacrilegious not to focus simply on celebrating the lives being saved. I do celebrate those saved lives, but the success doesn't feel connected to the intersectional space in which I, and many others, exist. I took my risks in many different spaces, including casual s*x and the foolish innocence of love. Twenty-five years on I understand my risk-taking and feel confident enough not to be ashamed of it or shamed by it.

We Love This Fitness Blogger's Response to Haters Who Say Strength Training Makes Women Look 'Manly'

  We Love This Fitness Blogger's Response to Haters Who Say Strength Training Makes Women Look 'Manly' <p>Instagram star Kelsey Wells claps back at the trolls who say strength training makes women look "too manly."</p>As anyone who has ever stepped into a weight room knows, women own the room as much as men do. And they have good reason to love lifting. Studies have shown that lifting weights builds strength, improves overall functionality, and helps maintain muscle mass as you age.

If we leave them out, we won’t succeed in fighting HIV /AIDS.” Deeply Talks: Why 70% of People in Modern Slavery are Women and Girls. Oct.

10 June 2015 – Despite considerable advances made in the global response to the AIDS epidemic over the last several decades, young women and adolescent girls in Africa “ are still being left behind ,” according to a new joint report from the United Nations and the African Union.

We live in a society that is structurally and systemically sexist and racist, so young white men are without doubt at the front of every queue that exists, be that in FTSE companies, wages, political structures...the list goes on. Thus reading that young white men have been the first to benefit from our improved HIV strategy won't surprise anyone. Privilege works by birth so it isn't anything that this group of young white men are actively doing, and it's really tough to highlight because there is no privilege that comes with an HIV diagnosis. Young, white, gay men are certainly not to blame – I doubt anyone is – but we cannot ignore the lack of improvement in the rates of women being diagnosed with HIV.

Why and how are women being so ignored in this fight? Look at the number of places reserved for all others (including women) on the PrEP Impact Trial: 2,000 out of 10,000. If 25% of all new HIV infections last year were women, why would there not be 2,500 places reserved on the trial specifically for women? Why has there been very little promotion of the PrEP trial among women, to increase identification of PrEP as a really effective way of preventing HIV transmission? Women, we are starting to find, have seldom even heard of PrEP; they have no concept that it exists.

Pilot boots New York activist from American Airlines flight

  Pilot boots New York activist from American Airlines flight New York activist Tamika Mallory says she was booted from an American Airlines flight in Miami after a pilot inserted himself into a dispute over her seat assignment.&nbsp;Mallory, a co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington, was traveling home to New York when the pilot followed her to scold her over an argument she had with a gate agent.

“The challenge to us is not just the number of people left behind ; it is who they are and why they are left behind .” At the opening of the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australian Justice Michael Kirby spoke about the progress made in the fight against HIV

In the face of a disease that extends far beyond our borders, the United States remains committed to leading the world in the fight against HIV /AIDS and ensuring no one is left behind .

I recently gave a talk at Oxford University's Wadham College around risk and historically marginalised groups, and we started to talk about prevention and then PrEP. I asked the room for a show of hands as to who knew about PrEP – the only hands that went up were those of the gay men present. It's great that they knew, but no woman put her hand up and when questioned, not a single woman had heard about PrEP, or PEP. Only sexism can explain why women who say they know they take risks – which is their right – do not know that there is a simple way to protect themselves from HIV.

Why does the notion still swirl around that women don't take risks when it comes to s*x and love? Love, the space in which we all throw caution to the wind and say yes, I trust you.

Why do we still act as if this 'risk space' only houses men, specifically young gay men? How dare we still label gay men as inherent risk takers and label women as only victims of sex if they test positive for HIV?

I asked Dr. Shema Tariq why she felt the numbers of women still contracting HIV had remained almost static for years.

The health checks you should have throughout your life

  The health checks you should have throughout your life Because it's better to be safe than sorryUnfortunately, it's possible to contract an illness or become unwell at any point in your life, and the best way to avoid this is to get regular tests and check-ups - starting in your 20s.

In the Fight against AIDS, People Who Inject Drugs Are Being Left Behind . About This Image. A worker with an HIV /AIDS harm reduction program refills a box with new syringes which will be available to injecting drug users under a syringe-exchange program in Taunggyi, Myanmar.

There was an error decoding this link. Please try the link again, or contact the sender of the email.

'Poor research and an assumption that women don't know about their risks or how to protect themselves, sexism and misogyny still drives so much of what we do. Women have seldom been the principle targets of prevention campaigns. Women have really only been focused on in relation to HIV through pregnancy and then they are not the focus, the wellbeing of the baby is. We understand how that happens but the mother is often placed outside of the equation with hardly any time to come to terms with their own diagnosis. Historically most women find out they are positive through pregnancy screening.'

This is backed up when I have the opportunity to speak with a young British-born Muslim woman who is of Caribbean parentage, who told me in almost hushed tones that whenever people talk about 'at risk groups' they talk only of Africans. She feels silenced by her absence in the debate. She has been isolated and often alone since being diagnosed through her pregnancy screening.

'They told me the baby was the only thing to worry about, they treated me terribly throughout my pregnancy, made me feel guilty and because I was British born made me feel that somehow I should have known better. I felt blamed and shamed and it's taken me years to build up my confidence around my HIV status.'

How Grandmothers Raised $27 Million To Fight AIDS — And Helped Cut Death Rates In Half

  How Grandmothers Raised $27 Million To Fight AIDS — And Helped Cut Death Rates In Half A new book from the Stephen Lewis Foundation celebrates the huge difference grandmothers in Africa and Canada have made in saving lives

There are still 34 million people living with HIV , however, and many countries still have high prevalence rates. due to elucatable conditions of birth and death education is key to fight against Hiv /Aids. Mike Hawthorn on No Girl Left Behind – Education in Africa.

In many ways, Philips says that the fight against HIV and AIDS has been “a victim of its own success.” “I definitely think that, in the region, there is unfinished business for the MDGs, for the people that have been left behind Philips said.

Jacqui Stevenson, who is currently researching ageing women living with HIV, agreed with Shema that poor research is often the gateway to women being left out of new interventions, and the myths surrounding women as poor research subjects have become structural and systemic through the years and this has resulted in an invisibility. Stevenson is one of the co leads on the Invisible No Longer study which looks at the experiences of women living with and at risk of HIV, it seeks to provide qualitative information about the lives and experiences of these frequently ignored groups.

Stevenson feels that often women in the sexual care setting have to prove their risk and entitlement and that this is purely misogynistic and an outcome of the ludicrous notion that only men have pleasure and therefore deserve protection and only women 'at risk' (frequently s*x workers are mentioned here despite seemingly showing little interest in PrEP) need prevention.

Dr Andy Williams and Dr Rageshri Dhairyawan, both sexual health and HIV specialists based at the London Hospital, expressed real worries that there are some groups already being left behind and that as the cuts really sink in, perhaps driven by the effectiveness of our new interventions (PrEP etc) that these groups will get left further and further behind.

'I had a patient who was so scared to continue with HIV care because of the punitive immigration atmosphere that they stopped treatment; a few months later they died.' Dr Rageshri is visibly upset recounting this story.

Study suggests women less likely to get CPR from bystanders

  Study suggests women less likely to get CPR from bystanders ANAHEIM, Calif. - Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 per cent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 per cent of men, and men were 23 per cent more likely to survive, the study found. It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus professional responders.

This issue matters to me deeply. And I've always tried to do my part in the fight against this disease, and the stigma and pain that accompanies it. In Sub-Saharan Africa, almost 60 percent of people with HIV are women and girls. We will not leave anyone behind .

Why don't you become the first? Still confused with the way? The reason of why you can receive and get this global health governance and the fight against hiv aids sooner is that this is the book in soft file form.

I asked them both what it was like working in an environment where you know the 'hard to reach' are becoming more isolated.

'Sometimes', said Andy, 'young clinicians starting out on their careers come here and meet patients, often from the South Asian community with a completely different view of sex and risk, already in a catastrophic situation, and the young doctors after a short time cannot cope, finding easy success here is tough. We know we have many more community links to build through the mosques etc and we know while we are doing this real lives are suffering. Women, often women who may not speak the language, are often most at risk.'

I got the sense talking to them that although they absolutely celebrated the brilliant work being done in reducing numbers of new HIV infections, that those improvements felt a million miles away from the quite bleak corridors of the old London Hospital.

On this World Aids Day let's try and remember that women have and enjoy sex, and that means they sometimes encounter risk. And, secondly, that not all transmission is through sex; some people, a few admittedly, are born with HIV. Let's think about their beautiful bravery this year. Both those living with HIV, those at risk from HIV, and those working in some of the toughest environments right here in our big sprawling city.

Note:A few days after the Wadham talk I was contacted by the Women's SU lead to say how appalled they were at the lack of sexual health promotion directed at women so they have decided to 'skill up' so that they can effectively campaign and lobby for inclusion in the story of PrEP.

Related: How Close Are We to Curing HIV/AIDS? (Provided by Seeker)

What to watch next
  • A Coaster Guess with Certain Success

    A Coaster Guess with Certain Success

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    4:10
  • How Close Are We to Photographing a Black Hole?

    How Close Are We to Photographing a Black Hole?

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    7:29
  • a close up of a tattoo: Doctors Have to Trick Your Brain's Defenses to Heal You, Here's Why

    Doctors Have to Trick Your Brain's Defenses to Heal You, Here's Why

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:54
  • a car parked in a parking lot: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:54
  • a close up of a spider: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:31
  • a man in a car posing for the camera: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:10
  • a group of people riding on the back of a vehicle: Fly With Hurricane Hunters as They Enter the Eye of a Storm

    Fly With Hurricane Hunters as They Enter the Eye of a Storm

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    4:55
  • a person swimming in water: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    4:00
  • a cup of coffee on a table: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:59
  • a group of people standing in front of a building: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:21
  • a close up of an insect: Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    2:28
  • a man and a woman taking a selfie: Master the Calendar in Minutes

    Master the Calendar in Minutes

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    8:48
  • Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:41
  • Related Video

    Related Video

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    3:21
  • a cup of coffee on a table: Could You Go a Week Without Producing Any Trash?

    Could You Go a Week Without Producing Any Trash?

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    5:58
  • a jellyfish in water: How Glow-in-the-Dark Jellyfish Inspired a Scientific Revolution

    How Glow-in-the-Dark Jellyfish Inspired a Scientific Revolution

    Seeker Logo
    Seeker
    4:06
UP NEXT
UP NEXT

For more of the most popular News, Sport, Lifestyle & Entertainment on MSN, Follow us on Facebook, and on Twitter

What I Didn’t Know About Having An Abortion .
The procedure left me weak from pain, blood loss and emotional exhaustion. Something was wrong, but I needed to fight to get help.I flip to the middle of the book, and the tone takes a sharp turn. Bible passages are underlined in red with drawings of dead babies and blood, and scrawls alongside them that say, “YOU’RE GOING TO HELL,” “SAVE YOUR BABY,” “WHY DO YOU HATE JESUS?” and “DIE BABY KILLERS.” I bring the book up to the receptionist. “Did you know this journal is full of anti-abortion hate speech?” I say. She narrows her eyes at me and takes it.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!