Health Here's what science says about coffee and cancer risks

13:01  01 april  2018
13:01  01 april  2018 Source:   cbc.ca

Bloating Could Be an Ovarian Cancer Symptom

  Bloating Could Be an Ovarian Cancer Symptom Here's when you should see a doctor.Although data on survival rates suggests the earlier you're diagnosed with ovarian cancer (i.e., stage 1), the more likely you are to beat it, only 34 percent of women say they'd contact a doctor about regular bloating, according to a recent survey conducted by the charity. Meanwhile, 50 percent of those surveyed said they'd try making dietary changes to relieve the condition before flagging the symptom to an MD - which could delay your diagnosis.

Can coffee cause cancer ? Trouble is brewing for all coffee admirers in California, where a Los Angeles judge ruled that a cancer warning must be visible to all consumers. This stems from a 30-year-old law known as Proposition 65

'If anything, coffee is protective for some types of cancer ,' says public health expert. The Associated Press · Posted: Apr 01, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: April 1. Here ' s what 's known about the risks .

a bowl of soup: A barista pours steamed milk in a coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles on Sept. 22, 2017. A judge has ruled that California law requires coffee companies to carry an ominous cancer warning label because of a chemical produced in the roasting process. But some experts disagree that coffee poses a cancer risk.© Richard Vogel/Associated Press A barista pours steamed milk in a coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles on Sept. 22, 2017. A judge has ruled that California law requires coffee companies to carry an ominous cancer warning label because of a chemical produced in the roasting process. But some experts disagree that coffee poses a cancer risk.

Trouble is brewing for coffee lovers in California, where a judge ruled that sellers must post scary warnings about cancer risks. But how frightened should we be of a daily cup of joe? Not very, some scientists and available evidence seem to suggest.

Scientific concerns about coffee have eased in recent years, and many studies even suggest it can help health.

The Latest Coffee Trend Is Cat Poop Coffee — & It's Very Expensive

  The Latest Coffee Trend Is Cat Poop Coffee — & It's Very Expensive The Latest Coffee Trend Is Cat Poop Coffee — & It's Very ExpensiveIt's called cat poop coffee, and it's popular in Vietnam and across Southeast Asia.

If anything, there is fairly good evidence of the benefit of coffee on cancer ,” said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health. Here ’ s what ’s known about the risks .

Trouble is brewing for coffee lovers in California, where a judge ruled that sellers must post scary warnings about cancer risks . But how frightened should we be of a daily cup of joe?

"At the minimum, coffee is neutral. If anything, there is fairly good evidence of the benefit of coffee on cancer," said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health.

The World Health Organization's cancer agency moved coffee off the "possible carcinogen" list two years ago, though it says evidence is insufficient to rule out any possible role.

The current flap isn't about coffee itself, but a chemical called acrylamide that's made when the beans are roasted. Government agencies call it a probable or likely carcinogen, based on animal research, and a group sued to require coffee sellers to warn of that under a California law passed by voters in 1986.

The problem: No one knows what levels are safe or risky for people. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets acrylamide limits for drinking water, but there aren't any for food.

I Spotted My Own Cancer in the Mirror—and It Saved My Life

  I Spotted My Own Cancer in the Mirror—and It Saved My Life Everyone checks the mirror in the morning before heading out the door; no one expects it to save their life. It did for Erin Kobetz, PhD, MPH, a cancer researcher at the University of Miami. Six weeks into her new job at the University, Kobetz noticed something odd about her throat as she got ready for work: “There’s no real way to explain it, other than my neck looked funny,” Dr. Kobetz recalls. Alarmed, she immediately made an appointment with her primary care physician. Her doctor agreed that her neck appeared unusual—but couldn’t say why. Dr.

If anything, there is fairly good evidence of the benefit of coffee on cancer ,” said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health. Here ’ s what ’s known about the risks .

" Coffee is at least neutral, and there is good evidence of the benefits of coffee in cancer ," said Drs. Edward Giovannucci, nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health. Here ' s what 's known about the risks .

"A cup of coffee a day, exposure probably is not that high," and probably should not change your habit, said Dr. Bruce Y. Lee of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "If you drink a lot of cups a day, this is one of the reasons you might consider cutting that down."

Here's what's known about the risks.

The chemical

Start with the biggest known risk factor for cancer — smoking — which generates acrylamide. In the diet, French fries, potato chips, crackers, cookies, cereal and other high-carbohydrate foods contain it as a byproduct of roasting, baking, toasting or frying.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration tests of acrylamide levels found they ranged from 175 to 351 parts per billion (a measure of concentration for a contaminant) for six brands of coffee tested; the highest was for one type of decaf coffee crystals. By comparison, French fries at one fast food chain ranged from 117 to 313 parts per billion, depending on the location tested. Some commercial fries had more than 1,000.

Bad News, Friends: Coffee Doesn't Actually Count Toward Your Daily Water Intake

  Bad News, Friends: Coffee Doesn't Actually Count Toward Your Daily Water Intake You'd be hard-pressed not to find a coffee-lover just about anywhere you go, and rightfully so. Not only can the sweet aroma of coffee be the perfect (and, let's be real, usually necessary) start to our mornings, but it also has tons of health benefits and can even help you lose weight. But does the water in coffee count toward your recommended daily intake of water? There are conflicting views regarding this because it's thought to be a diuretic (i.e. it makes you urinate more frequently), which makes it work against the antidiuretic hormone that our bodies produce.

Science Says : What we know about cancer risk and coffee . Trouble is brewing for coffee lovers in California, where a judge just ruled that sellers must post scary warnings about cancer risks . Here ’ s what ’s known about the risks .

Correction: Science Says - Coffee - Cancer Risk story. By: The Associated Press. Updated: Apr 3, 2018 - 1:29 PM. "If you drink a lot of cups a day, this is one of the reasons you might consider cutting that down." Here ' s what 's known about the risks .

Even some baby foods contain acrylamide, such as teething biscuits and crackers. One brand of organic sweet potatoes tested as having 121 parts per billion.

What's the risk?

The "probable" or "likely" carcinogen label is based on studies of animals given high levels of acrylamide in drinking water. But people and rodents absorb the chemical at different rates and metabolize it differently, so its relevance to human health is unknown.

A group of 23 scientists convened by the WHO's cancer agency in 2016 looked at coffee — not acrylamide directly — and decided coffee was unlikely to cause breast, prostate or pancreatic cancer, and that it seemed to lower the risks for liver and uterine cancers. Evidence was inadequate to determine its effect on dozens of other cancer types.

California law

Since 1986, businesses have been required to post warnings about chemicals known to cause cancer or other health risks — more than 900 substances are on the state's list today — but what's a "significant" risk is arguable.

Coffee sellers and other defendants in the lawsuit that spurred Thursday's ruling have a couple weeks to challenge it or appeal.

This Daily Habit Could Reduce Your Risk of Cancer by 20 Percent

  This Daily Habit Could Reduce Your Risk of Cancer by 20 Percent This Daily Habit Could Reduce Your Risk of Cancer by 20 Percent on ReadersDigest.com.The post This Daily Habit Could Reduce You appeared first on Best Health Magazine Canada. Your browser does not support this video require(["binding"], function (binding) { binding("wcVideoPlayer", "#video_player_9679b9df-3bb0-49bd-bada-d86ebaaa149b").

If anything, there is fairly good evidence of the benefit of coffee on cancer ," said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health. Here ' s what 's known about the risks .

If anything, there is fairly good evidence of the benefit of coffee on cancer ," said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, a nutrition expert at the Harvard School of Public Health. Here ' s what 's known about the risks .

The law "has potential to do much more harm than good to public health," by confusing people into thinking risks from something like coffee are similar to those from smoking, Giovannucci said.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration tests of acrylamide levels found they ranged from 175 to 351 parts per billion — a measure of concentration for a contaminant — for six brands of coffee tested.© Gregory Bull/Associated Press U.S. Food and Drug Administration tests of acrylamide levels found they ranged from 175 to 351 parts per billion — a measure of concentration for a contaminant — for six brands of coffee tested.

The International Food Information Council and Foundation, an organization funded mostly by the food and beverage industry, says the law is confusing the public because it doesn't note levels of risk, and adds that U.S. dietary guidelines say up to five cups of coffee a day can be part of a healthy diet.

Dr. Otis Brawley, the American Cancer Society's chief medical officer, said, "The issue here is dose, and the amount of acrylamide that would be included in coffee, which is really very small, compared to the amount from smoking tobacco. I don't think we should be worried about a cup of coffee."

Amy Trenton-Dietz, public health specialist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said the California ruling contrasts with what science shows.

"Studies in humans suggest that if anything, coffee is protective for some types of cancer," she said. "As long as people are not putting a lot of sugar or sweeteners in, coffee, tea and water are the best things for people to be drinking."

If You Have This One Specific Mark on Your Fingernail, You Should Get Checked for Cancer—Immediately .
Although you might never think to check your fingernails for cancer, it’s lucky that one manicurist did. Check these other sneaky places where you can get skin cancer (that aren’t your skin) too.“I had a walk-in nail client a couple weeks ago,” manicurist Jean Skinner wrote in a Facebook post. “She had a straight dark vertical stripe down her nail. She said as soon as she sat down—I need a color dark enough to cover this stripe.” Don’t miss the other cancer symptoms women are likely to ignore, either.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!