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Travel This Is Why It’s So Tough to Fall Asleep on an Airplane

09:57  14 november  2017
09:57  14 november  2017 Source:   readersdigest.ca

If You Don’t Sleep with Socks On, Here’s Why You Should Start Tonight

  If You Don’t Sleep with Socks On, Here’s Why You Should Start Tonight To wear or not to wear—that is, your socks to bed. The controversy over whether or not we’re supposed to wear socks to bed has been debated for years. Fortunately, we have an answer.Sure, those Christmas socks aren’t the most stylish, but keeping your feet warm at night has been proven to actually makes a difference in your sleeping patterns. According to sleep.org, “Heating cold feet causes vasodilation—dilation of the blood vessels—which may tell the brain that it is bedtime. After the blood vessels open in the hands and feet, heat is redistributed throughout the body to prepare for sleep.

When you’re on a plane , it doesn’t exactly work that way, making it difficult to summon the sandman. (If you’re still dead set on getting some shut-eye on your next flight, here are some shortcuts to fall asleep on a plane faster.) [Source: Mental Floss].

Why ? It ' s easier to fall asleep because you can rest your head on the window, either with or without a pillow, you won't be woken up by a fellow passenger looking to get into the aisle, and you can control the light exposure since you're next to the shade.

a young man taking a selfie in a car© aslysun

Whether you’re lounging or in the upright and locked position, a plane seat just isn’t your bed. (This is the reason why your seat needs to be “upright and locked” during takeoff and landing.) The seats are more sardine-packed than ever before. Plus, you’re hurtling through the air at 550 miles per hour. How are you expected to sleep through that? (This is the reason why you should never sleep during takeoff or landing.)

In short, catching some sleep while flying is just plane difficult. The nut of the issue is structural, not stimuli-related: The human body just isn’t designed to sleep sitting up.

If you’re hoping to catch a quick snooze though, you might just be fine. But for those overnight long-distance flights, your sleep cycle is actively fighting against you. Dr. Neil Kline, a sleep disorder physician and the CEO of the American Sleep Association, spoke to Mental Floss about the sleep stage which makes your airline sleeping efforts so Herculean.

This Secret Button on Your Airplane Seat Will Instantly Give You More Space

  This Secret Button on Your Airplane Seat Will Instantly Give You More Space Ever wish you could just press a button and your airplane seat would become instantly less confining? As a traveler, there’s a lot we don’t know about airplanes: why the windows are round, why the lights dim during landing and takeoff, and how do those tiny tires on the landing gear not pop when they hit the runway? And, while we’ve explained all those quirks before, there’s one little aspect of an airplane seat, we’ve yet to reveal: the secret button that will turn your aisle seat into a spacious oasis. Ok, not exactly an oasis, but it will give you a little more room to breathe.

However, it has recently been revealed why some passengers can avoid the nerves and even fall asleep during take off, whilst others cannot. It may not always be a good thing to fall asleep during take off, as certain studies also reveal.

( It ' s a lot easier than trying to fall asleep on a neck pillow while basically sitting upright.) Getting a good night’s sleep when you're overheated can be tough . Here's how to cool down a

“Usually during REM sleep, other than eye movements, our voluntary muscles are paralyzed….We likely evolved this disconnect during REM sleep in order to prevent injury to ourselves.”

REM sleep kicks into gear about 70 to 90 minutes into your snooze. So you might be coasting along just fine, but once this stage hits, the sleep posture you took so much time to adjust yourself into goes out the window. If you’re in the middle seat, you might just bump into your neighbour; if you’re by the window, you might just slide your head against that cold plexiglass; if you have an aisle seat, well, you’re possibly colliding into a drink cart.

Bottom line: When you hit REM stage in your bed, gravity isn’t working against you, and you’re obviously working with a lot more space; the paralysis is relatively harmless. When you’re on a plane, it doesn’t exactly work that way, making it difficult to summon the sandman. (If you’re still dead set on getting some shut-eye on your next flight, here are some shortcuts to fall asleep on a plane faster.)

Heard of sleep sex? Here are 7 mysterious things that happen when you are sleeping

  Heard of sleep sex? Here are 7 mysterious things that happen when you are sleeping Recurring dream can be fascinating for some, but it could be disturbing for the person dealing with it. The recurring dreams are often related to our lives, at least partially. It is repeated by the brain again and again. There is no proper explanation for this, but it is believed that the dreams are played repeatedly by the mind so that you can come in terms with it.

WATCH: Here’ s The One Drink You Should Order On An Airplane . Airplanes also use light to help passengers adjust to new time zones. If you have ever taken an intercontinental flight and fallen asleep , only to be awoken when the cabin crew turns on the lights, they are doing it for a

When your body temp is high, it ’ s tougher to fall asleep . Try sleeping naked instead since this will help cool your body down. 14. Have an orgasm. That’s why this post will teach you to fall asleep faster – once you’re already in bed. 1. Practice the 4-7-8 technique. Manipulating your breathing is a great

[Source: Mental Floss]

The post This Is Why It’s So Tough to Fall Asleep on an Airplane appeared first on Reader's Digest.

The one thing you should never wear going to the airport .
<p>Airport security can be a real hassle; not knowing which piece of your jewellery will set off the metal detector, forgetting about that loose change in your pocket, or awkwardly removing your belt in front of everyone.</p>But out of all the things that set off the alarm, there's one little thing most of us wear that airport security officers would love to see less of.

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