Travel Here's What Would Happen If Every Passenger Jumped up and Down on a Plane at Once

09:56  08 february  2018
09:56  08 february  2018 Source:   Travel + Leisure

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Originally Answered: If everyone on the plane jumped at once , what would be the impact? As alluded to in Derek' s answer-having half or even more of the passengers jumping up and down is not really much of a problem.

Have you ever wondered what would happen if every single passenger on a plane got up at the same time and started jumping up and down ?

An Air Canada plane. (Picture for representation purpose only)© Artur Widak/NurPhoto An Air Canada plane. (Picture for representation purpose only)

Have you ever wondered what would happen if every single passenger on a plane got up at the same time and started jumping up and down?

No? You haven’t? Well, we have, and luckily for us, Quora user Steve Angel wondered the same thing. He posted his question to the social networking site and in return we all get to enjoy this rather in-depth answer by P. J. Harb, who notes he is an engineer, musician, traveler, linguist, and “aspiring pilot.”

“To answer your question, let’s say each one of the 300 passengers weighs 75 kilograms,” Harb began. For the Americans in the crowd, that’s about 165 pounds. “75 KGs x 300 passengers = total weight of 22,500 KGs/22.5 tonnes. If they all jumped at the exact same time, let’s imagine there is a sudden force equal to a mass of 22.5 tonnes.” That 22.5 tonnes equates to 45,000 pounds.

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The plane might dip down several inches or so, assuming each and every person, cabin crew and passenger alike, jumped . If everyone in a plane were to jump up at the very same time, what would happen to the plane ?

Every movement an airplane makes is around it' s CG. If everyone jumped at once , at first they would accelerate the aircraft downwards as they propel themselves up . Now what would happen if the passengers happened to jump up and down repeatedly at a resonant frequency in the flight

The average Boeing 777 aircraft, Harb said, weighs around 300,000 pounds (without passengers, bags, or fuel). With payload at take-off, that number will be closer to 400,000 to 500,000 pounds, or 200-250 tonnes.

“These 250 tonnes will be moving at around 500 miles per hour mid-flight. Because of the aircraft’s weight and speed, even if there was a 22.5-tonne sudden/brief downward force within, its flight would be mostly unfazed,” Harb explained. “Its altitude (height) may decrease slightly but only for a brief moment, because its autopilot system will immediately correct it. The pilot will feel some vibrations.”

In a twist, Harb explained that there are much stronger forces already exerted on an aircraft’s fuselage (body) during severe weather conditions.

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Related QuestionsMore Answers Below. If everyone in a plane were to jump up at the very same time, what would happen to the plane ? What would happen to a flying passenger jet if all of the passengers jumped up and down at the same time?

up vote 6 down vote favorite. As a thought experiment, imagine a plane with minimal fuel/appliances on board with hundreds of heavy passengers that make up say 10% of the weight of the plane . What happens if all pax/cargo suddenly jumped to tail or cockpit section?

“The autopilot system is constantly monitoring the aircraft’s altitude and speed, and adjusts engine power based on these. For example in bad weather, a microburst (sudden downward burst of wind) exerts a super strong force on the aircraft, and the autopilot system works to correct it immediately, by increasing engine power and pitching the aircraft up.”

To sum it up, Harb said, the force exerted by the 300 unruly passengers would do little to the aircraft, so we can all rest assured that if our flight breaks out into a dance party we will still make it to our destination safely.

For the record, this isn’t the first time a very important aviation question has been answered on Quora. In 2017, a flight attendant also gave a very detailed answer when asked about how to survive a plane crash, while another attendant shared the best breakfast options on varying flights.

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