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Travel Why Plastic in Our Oceans Is a Travel Problem, Too: Travelogue Podcast

16:55  10 june  2018
16:55  10 june  2018 Source:   cntraveler.com

The Women Owning Adventure Travel Right Now

  The Women Owning Adventure Travel Right Now The Women Owning Adventure Travel Right NowIt's a through line in a lot of our stories lately: sometimes, it's good to be a little afraid before an adventure. Our editor in chief, Pilar Guzmán, wrote about it in her editor's letter, "It’s Only an Adventure If You’re a Little Terrified," for our third issue of the year, while Condé Nast Traveler's special correspondent Sophy Roberts grappled with the intense remoteness of Kamchatka, Russia's adventure playground.

We dive deep into how water plays a part in our travel lives. That's why on this week's Travelogue podcast , we brought in two crack reporters to tell us all about the physical and psychological benefits of water known as the "blue mind," as well as how to best explore the world's oceans .

To keep up with our podcast each week, subscribe to Travelogue on the iTunes store or the podcasting app of your choice. Read on for the 2016 Top Travel Specialists We Trust, vetted and approved by Traveler editors.

a sunset over a body of water © Getty
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There are some things that are just too damn big to fit into our little brains: The scale of the universe, the size of a T-Rex, the amount of plastic in our oceans. To wrap our heads around it, we need to resort to analogies, comparisons, or shrink the problem down into something comprehensible—so how's this? The equivalent of an entire NYC garbage truck full of plastic enters our oceans every minute, and by 2050, there will be more plastic in the sea than fish. Or this: There are 500 times more pieces of plastic on earth than there are stars in our galaxy. But despite the problem being so immense, sometimes we don't notice it until it washes up on our favorite beach, or gets into our favorite food (yep, there are probably microplastics in that tuna you're eating).

We Kept Cheese in the Fridge for 40 Days. Here's Which Storage Method Actually Worked.

  We Kept Cheese in the Fridge for 40 Days. Here's Which Storage Method Actually Worked. We tested five cheese storage methods—including a cheese vault!—to find out which worked best.In efforts to prevent that happening ever again, I decided to see exactly how long cheese would last in the refrigerator. However, I didn't just want to pop a brick of shrink-wrapped colby inside and start the clock—I wanted to see which common storage method would really keep my cheese the freshest. So I rounded up a few traditional methods and one novel storage idea and put them to the test.

Plastic pollution is an enormous problem , worldwide. According to the documentary, an estimated 4.7 million tons of plastic ends up in our oceans each year, where wave action turns them into a plastic soup that damages sea life and marine ecosystems.

To keep up with our podcast each week, subscribe to Travelogue on the iTunes store. Want even more info? Check out this week's Facebook Live, where we answer questions from readers on all things Africa.

This week on the Travelogue podcast, we try our best to understand the magnitude of plastic's hold on our ocean ecosystems—and talk about what you can do to end it. Luckily, we've got some help from someone who really knows their stuff when it comes to the threats facing oceans: Ayana Johnson, marine biologist and founder of the Ocean Collectiv (not a typo), an organization that works for ocean sustainability backed by social justice. We talk about the little things you can change in your daily life: say no to straws, plastic bags, and plastic bottles of water—you don't need them. But we also talk about how the problem is much greater than just your individual action. Governmental policies need to change. Our culture needs to shift away single-use everything. Businesses need to get involved. We might finally be starting to move in the right direction: airlines, hotels, and even entire countries are making moves towards getting rid of single-use plastic. But if our oceans are ever going to be healthy again, we've got a long way to go.

There Are No Countries in the World That Begin with These 2 Letters

  There Are No Countries in the World That Begin with These 2 Letters Photo: ShutterStock Bet You Can’t Name a Country That Begins With These Two Letters! Put your thinking caps on, globe-savvy readers. Can you name a country that starts with every letter in the English alphabet? Some might come to you right away, like Australia, Brazil, and Canada. Others could be trickier, like Kenya or Luxembourg. While you could go on like this for all 195 countries, you won't solve it for all 26 letters in the alphabet. In fact, no matter how long you muse and mull over this puzzling problem, there are two letters that no countries in the world start with. See if you can guess which ones they are. Ready for the answer? Drum roll, please: Turns out, no countries in the world start with the letters W or X. Some might be quick to point out that Wales, which is considered a country, starts with the letter W. But Wales is actually part of a larger 'sovereign state,' the United Kingdom, and is not a member of the United Nations (UN). As a result, it is often not included in official totals of countries. (This is the real difference between the United Kingdom and Great Britain.) If you guessed Y, you were close--but you probably forgot about Yemen, which is the only country in the world that starts with the letter Y. Meanwhile, Oman is the only country that starts with the letter O. Other rare letters include Q and Z; no countries but Zambia and Zimbabwe begin with the letter Z, while Qatar is the lone country that starts with Q.

Thanks to our host Brad Rickman for framing the discussion and confronting head-on whether climate change really is a travel story (it is), and to editors Sebastian Modak To keep up with our podcast each week, subscribe to Travelogue on the iTunes store or the podcasting app of your choice.

Travelogue Podcast . by CNT Editors. But, is there a point where travel becomes a competition for bragging rights and a life constantly on the move starts to eat away at any semblance of normalcy or stability—and, if so, is that a bad thing? To keep up with our podcast each week, subscribe to

Thanks to our host Brad Rickman, editors Mara Balagtas and Sebastian Modak, and contributor Cassie Shortsleeve for a spirited and enlightening conversation. A special shout-out to Ayana Johnson, whose passion for our oceans we're sure you'll find contagious. As usual, an extra helping of gratitude to our engineer Brett Fuchs. Check back every Friday for our latest installment of Travelogue. To keep up with our podcast each week, subscribe to Travelogue on the iTunes store or the podcasting app of your choice.

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