Canada Famed University of Alberta paleontologist Phil Currie part of team studying world's largest dinosaur eggs

23:07  09 may  2017
23:07  09 may  2017 Source:   Edmonton Journal

Alberta is Canada's only majority-male province

  Alberta is Canada's only majority-male province For people who study demographics, the province is an outlier.“We actually just got our first female journeyman here, and I’ve been working for about three years,” said Braun, on a break from class at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) where he’s an apprentice electrician. “Before that, I hadn’t heard of any female apprentices or journeymen.

A Chinese farmer has led famed University of Alberta paleontologist Phil Currie to a nest containing the largest dinosaur eggs ever found. Currie , who has been working on the discovery since 1993, was taken in 2015 to the site in the central Chinese province of Henan by one of the farmers who

Philip Currie . Q: Why is paleontology so important today? I wanted to be part of the team since I was 11 years old and read "All about Dinosaurs " by Roy Chapman Andrews. I wanted to become a paleontologist for many other reasons as well; the lifestyle of a paleontologist appealed to me

050917-2YHSs8BO9Z.jpeg-0510_news_eggs-W.jpg:   © Philip_John_Currie  

A Chinese farmer has led famed University of Alberta paleontologist Phil Currie to a nest containing the largest dinosaur eggs ever found.

Currie, who has been working on the discovery since 1993, was taken in 2015 to the site in the central Chinese province of Henan by one of the farmers who found the half-metre-long eggs about 25 years ago.

“It was the most astounding thing. The whole area had been ripped up by enormous equipment terracing the mountainsides to plant walnut trees. The one slope remaining was where these giant eggs came from, and we found shells from the same specimen three decades later,” Currie said in a Tuesday news release. 

Going Back to Pluto? Scientists to Push for Orbiter Mission

  Going Back to Pluto? Scientists to Push for Orbiter Mission Humanity's first up-close look at Pluto was so intriguing that some researchers want to go back and spend a lot more time studying the icy world. Late last month, 35 scientists met for 7 hours in Houston to discuss the basic blueprint and science goals of a potential Pluto orbiter mission. Such an effort would build upon the knowledge gained during the epic Pluto flyby performed in July 2015 by NASA's New Horizons probe.Participants came away from the April 24 workshop fired up and committed to doing their best to make such a project happen, said New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern, who was there.

未指定的错误. Server is too busy.

A University of Alberta paleontologist was part of a team to unveil what may be one of the largest carnivorous dinosaurs known. The U of A' s Dr. Philip Currie and professor Rodolfo Coria of the Museo Carmen Funes in Argentina have identified and named the new species, Mapusaurus rosea.

Currie and an international team first thought they were tyrannosaur eggs, but determined from the skull of a fossilized embryo they were related to caenagnathids or oviraptorosaurs from Alberta.

A full-sized adult would have weighed two tonnes.

This was a partial nest containing six and nine eggs, unlike a normal oviraptorosaur nest that would have 30 or 40 eggs, the mother positioned in the middle to protect them with long feathers behind her arms.

It’s extremely rare to find dinosaur eggs and embryos because they’re usually dissolved by soil acidity or eaten by scavengers, Currie said.

An article in open-access journal Nature Communications by a group including Currie and his wife and U of A paleobotanist Eva Koppelhus says the specimens were among the most significant of thousands of eggs illegally exported from China in the 1980s and 1990s.

These included the embryo skeleton, nicknamed Baby Louie, which was featured in a National Geographic story and displayed by an Indianapolis museum for 12 years before it was sent back to the Henan Geological Museum in 2013.

gkent@postmedia.com

twitter.com/GKentYEG

 

Baby Kessel named after Penguins right winger Phil Kessel .
Kessel Ryan Hillman was born on Mother's Day at Butler Memorial Hospital. His parents, Nicole and Adam Hillman, said they didn't know they were having a boy, but decided that if they did, he would be named after Pittsburgh Penguins right winger Phil Kessel. "The perfect name for our son," Adam Hillman said. Little Kessel was born while his father played "Let's Go Pens" in the delivery room, mother Nicole said. Nicole said after baby Kessel was born, they realized, it was meant to be. "Sure enough, they put me in bed No. 81," Nicole said, referring to Phil Kessel's jersey number. "He was born at 6:53 p.m. and the winning goal was scored at 6:55," Nicole said. That was a day later, but scored by none other than Phil Kessel. Baby Kessel's parents say their baby boy, already has a love for the game. "He loves listening to the hockey games. He definitely recognizes that as a sound as he has gone to the games before with me," Nicole said.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
This is interesting!