Canada Toronto police chief Mark Saunders rejects ‘crisis point’ claims by officers

17:28  12 july  2017
17:28  12 july  2017 Source:   Toronto Star

Winnipeg police arrest suspect in attempted child abduction

  Winnipeg police arrest suspect in attempted child abduction The 26-year-old suspect of an attempted child abduction is facing more charges after allegedly assaulting two police officers. Police say Ruben Kyle Mawakeesick resisted arrest July 2 after officers issued a call for help locating his whereabouts. Mawakeesick is accused of trying to abduct a four-year-old girl from her mother in broad daylight in the city's North End June 29. The mother claims she was out for a walk with her daughter near the 300 block of McKenzie Street just before 3 p.m. when the suspect grabbed the girl and tried to leave. The mother was able to retrieve her daughter, who was unharmed in the incident. The mother, however, sustained a minor injury that needed medical attention. After an investigation, officers identified Mawakeesick as the suspect and issued the call for help July 2. That same day just after 5 p.m., officers located a home in the 700 block of Toronto Street and found Mawakeesick. That's when he assaulted the two officers and later committed an "indecent act" at the Winnipeg police headquarters. The initial warrant for his arrest include a slew of charges, including abduction of a person under 14 years old, sexual assault, sexual interference and assault causing bodily harm. After his arrest, he faces more charges including assaulting a peace officer and failure to comply with a probation order. He has been detained in custody.

Police Chief Mark Saunders is dismissing suggestions that morale is at an “all-time low” among front-line officers , calling it a union “soundbite” that isn’t rooted in reality.

Police Chief Mark Saunders is dismissing suggestions that morale is at an “all-time low” among front-line officers , calling it a union “soundbite” that isn’t rooted in reality.


Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders says hiring more police officers isn't what the organization needs right now. “We need to put our officers in the right place and the right time.” © Rick Madonik Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders says hiring more police officers isn't what the organization needs right now. “We need to put our officers in the right place and the right time.”

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders is defending plans to modernize the service and rejecting police union claims that staff cuts have reached a “crisis point,” putting officers and the public at risk.

“Just hiring more police officers right now is doing a disservice to the organization,” Saunders told CBC Radio’s Metro Morning on Wednesday.

The service wants and needs to improve the deployment model, so, for example, highly trained officers aren’t sitting around guarding crime scenes for days on end, he said.

Beloved Canadian teacher found dead in New Mexico along with husband

  Beloved Canadian teacher found dead in New Mexico along with husband A Canadian woman and her husband were found dead inside a vehicle parked near an interstate highway in New Mexico, police said.The bodies of Ursula Tammy Kokotkiewicz, 32, and Jacob Kokotkiewicz, 31, were found in a blue Dodge pickup last Thursday. Officers spotted the vehicle while responding to an unrelated incident, New Mexico State Police told CBC News.

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders doesn't buy the idea that officers are burned out. He joined NEWSTALK 1010's Moore in the Morning on Tuesday to respond to claims by the police union that officers are stressed and under-staffed.

This web site is not accessible in your region. Police union chief claims officers may have to display ISIS flags after

“We need to put our officers in the right place and the right time.”

Saunders was also skeptical of the Toronto Police Association assertion that officer morale is rock bottom, suggesting the surveys used by the union might be “skewed.”

And the chief said he can’t answer whether officers are working to rule.

“I know that they’re going to be answering the calls when they’re called to be there.”

The Toronto Police Association launched a website this week, saying the force has nearly 500 fewer officers than it did in 2010 and may cut another 400 by 2019.

“Our members are trying to make a bad situation work by trying to do more with less,” said union president Mike McCormack.

It is causing some concerns around public safety and officer safety, McCormack said.

Andrew Loku coroner's inquest urges Taser for police, re-igniting debate

  Andrew Loku coroner's inquest urges Taser for police, re-igniting debate A coroner's inquest into the police shooting death of Andrew Loku recommends officers in Ontario be armed with a taser instead, re-igniting a contentious debate.The recommendation came from the five-person jury at the inquest into the police shooting of Andrew Loku. The 45-year-old, who was originally from South Sudan and had a history of mental health issues, held a hammer as he walked towards police in his apartment hallway. A 911 call that night said a man with a hammer had threatened to kill his neighbour.

Command Officers ' biographies. Mark Saunders . Chief of Police . Chief Mark Saunders is in his 32nd year with the Toronto Police Service. Throughout his career, Chief Saunders has had an extensive investigative background within the portfolios of: Professional Standards, Urban Street

Toronto police Chief Mark Saunders sent a letter to the force following an attack on police officers in Dallas, taking the opportunity to point out those looking to 'drive a wedge between the TPS and the LGBTQ communities'.

The Toronto Police Service is currently under a three-year freeze on hiring and promotions. The move was one of a series of recommendations in a report released by the police board’s “Transformational Task Force” in January — a group of civilians and officers that’s part of a larger effort to modernize the force and cut police spending.

On Tuesday, Mayor John Tory, a member of the civilian oversight board, said he would like to see the association help with bringing about change “instead of trying to resist it and protect the status quo.”

“I think it’s time they came to the table and acted as our partner in modernizing policing,” the mayor said.

In two collective agreements, the association agreed to come to the table to talk about shift scheduling and two-officers-per-car at night policy, both identified as cost-saving ways the service can revamp its deployment model, Tory noted.

“It’s been very difficult to get those discussions going.”

Those changes would allow more effective deployment, Tory said.

“That’s what we need Mr. McCormack and the association on board, helping to bring about those changes in the best way possible, not kind of lobbing in hand grenades from the sidelines.”

Police watchdog clears Winnipeg officers accused of assaulting man in custody .
The Independent Investigation Unit of Manitoba has cleared two officers of wrongdoing after a man accused them of assaulting and stealing money from him while he was in police custody. Winnipeg police arrested the man on Oct. 4, 2016, in connection with a number of offences, the IIU said. He filed a complaint two weeks later alleging an officer bent and broke his hand while in custody. He also claimed police went into his apartment and stole money.The IIU investigates all serious incidents involving police, including when someone is seriously injured, and took over the investigation last fall.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
This is interesting!