Canada NewsAlert: Study links vets and suicide risk

22:54  07 december  2017
22:54  07 december  2017 Source:   MSN

'Our kids are crying out for help': Sask. report shares Indigenous youth solutions on suicide

  'Our kids are crying out for help': Sask. report shares Indigenous youth solutions on suicide Saskatchewan's Advocate for Children and Youth Corey O'Soup says young Indigenous people in the province's north have told him much more needs to be done to prevent suicide. For more than a year, the advocate's office interviewed 264 Indigenous young people from across the north to write the report, focusing on everything from bullying to lack of emotional support. "Our kids are crying out for our help," said Advocate for Children and Youth Corey O'Soup. "And as they cry out for help, they're literally dying as we stand by and wait for tragedy to happen. Let's not wait for the next kid to die.

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The study also shows that veterans have been at an increased risk of suicide , compared with the general population, over the past four decades. Notice: Your email may not yet have been verified. Please check your email, click the link to verify your address, and then submit your comment.

  NewsAlert: Study links vets and suicide risk © Provided by thecanadianpress.com

OTTAWA - A landmark new study from Veterans Affairs Canada appears to confirm what many have long feared: Canadians who have served in uniform are at greater risk of taking their own lives than members of the general public.

Researchers used nearly 40 years of data from Veterans Affairs, the Department of National Defence and Statistics Canada to review the records of more than 200,000 former service members.

The troubling study shows that male veterans were 1.4 times more at risk of suicide than men who had never served in the Canadian military, particularly in the case of younger men.

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The risk for female veterans was found to be even higher — 1.8 times greater than for women who hadn't served. Age was not a factor.

The study also shows that veterans have been at an increased risk of suicide, compared with the general population, over the past four decades.

The Veterans Affairs Canada study is the first of its kind, and comes amid a new government push to reduce the number of suicides and improve the mental health of current and former military members.

Antidepressants found in fish flowing into Cootes Paradise, making them vulnerable: study .
Residue from antidepressant drugs flowing through the Dundas Wastewater Treatment Plant into Cootes Paradise is showing up in fish and apparently making them more vulnerable to predators, a new study has found. A team of researchers with Environment and Climate Change Canada and McMaster University found fish with elevated levels of serotonin in their blood plasma were more active and willing to explore than fish kept away from waste water treatment plant discharges.

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