Canada Why John Horgan deserves credit for going ahead with Site C

09:51  12 december  2017
09:51  12 december  2017 Source:   macleans.ca

MPs give Equifax rough ride over breach

  MPs give Equifax rough ride over breach OTTAWA - MPs chastised an Equifax Canada executive Monday for not doing more to make amends to thousands of Canadians whose personal information was compromised by hackers. John Russo, chief privacy officer for the Canadian branch of the global credit-reporting firm, faced a barrage of pointed questions at a House of Commons committee over how the breach happened and the adequacy of the company's response. Russo unreservedly apologized for the lapse at Equifax's U.S. parent that affected 19,000 Canadians this year.© Provided by thecanadianpress.

Opinion: Analysis shows the answer to the Site C question is not so clear cut as polarized camps would have you believe.

12.12.17 - Comment on Why John Horgan deserves credit for . 11.12.17 - B. C . government decides -billion Site C hydro. 11.12.17 - Premier John Horgan to announce decision on Site C .

a man in a suit and tie: British Columbia Premier John Horgan THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. British Columbia Premier John Horgan THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Blake Shaffer is a PhD candidate at the University of Calgary, Fellow-in-Residence at the C.D. Howe Institute, and former electricity trader.

The bated-breath decision on Site C, B.C.’s controversial-is-an-understatement dam on the Peace River, has been made. John Horgan and the B.C. NDP have decided to complete the project begun by Christy Clark’s Liberal government.

The cheers and boos heard far and wide from this decision reinforce the notion that, lately, it seems public policy debates have turned into the less-fun equivalent of a sports match—“which side are you on?” Be it pipelines or Site C, the debate often devolves into polarized groups, each unwilling to acknowledge the arguments of the other.

REAL SCOOP: Bacon hopes for bail hearing before Christmas

  REAL SCOOP: Bacon hopes for bail hearing before Christmas Jamie Bacon is hoping to spend his first Christmas outside of jail since 2008. His lawyer Kimberly Eldred told me Monday that her client hopes to have a bail hearing sometime before the holiday. Here’s our story: Jamie Bacon to apply for bail: Lawyer Days after murder and conspiracy charges were stayed against Jamie […]Jamie Bacon is hoping to spend his first Christmas outside of jail since 2008. His lawyer Kimberly Eldred told me Monday that her client hopes to have a bail hearing sometime before the holiday.

Shaffer (" Why John Horgan deserves credit for going ahead with Site C ") not disclose that he was a BC Hydro electricity trader & his father Marv Already spent 4 bill, hard 2 go back 2 bond holders & tell them ‘sorry we screwed ’. BC’s credit would have been downgraded, interest would have went up.

Calling it a "difficult decision," the B. C . government has decided to go ahead with the controversial Site C hydroelectric dam, paving the way for work to restart. Premier John Horgan is giving the green light to continued construction on the controversial Site C dam project.

It needn’t be. Passion and engagement in public policy discourse is critically important, but so too is the need for dispassionate analysis.

Let’s start with what is clear about Site C

Site C should never have started in the first place. It was not needed in the timeframe advanced by the previous government. The Joint Review Panel concluded as much. Delaying the project until the need was clear was in the public’s best interest at the time. The decision by the previous government to skip a full B.C. Utilities Commission hearing on Site C was egregious, but the decision now must be forward looking.

From a political perspective, Premier Horgan was in a no-win situation. Choose ‘complete’ and the Greens gain voters at the expense of the NDP. Choose ‘terminate’ and the ‘Party of No’ moniker the BC Liberals successfully applied to the NDP in the 2013 election would resurface and swing votes in the mushy middle of the electorate.

Reports of discarded needles nearly double in Winnipeg

  Reports of discarded needles nearly double in Winnipeg Reports of discarded needles have skyrocketed in Winnipeg, with the number of cases quadrupling in the last two years, according to data from the city. So far this year, the City of Winnipeg has received more than 430 reports of discarded needles on public property. That's up from 231 in 2016 and just 107 in 2015. City crews are dispatched immediately when calls about needles come into 311. The crews inspect the site and then dispose of the needle using "safe sharps disposal practices," according to city officials.

READ: Why John Horgan deserves credit for going ahead with Site C . anti- Site C Green Party—even more untenable for months, perhaps years, to come. The first problem with the decision is that some Indigenous groups oppose the project.

Speaking at the Legislature in Victoria on December 11, 2017, the New Democratic Party Premier of British Columbia, John Horgan , announces - with regret

COUNTERPOINT: Why approving Site C is the B.C. NDP’s first serious political blunder

On balance, the easiest political route for Horgan was surely to terminate and blame the whole mess on the previous government. That he didn’t, despite the political and personal reasons to do so (he has in the past been vocally against the project) speaks to a decision that was made in the view that it was in the public interest.

But was it? Let’s examine the pros and cons.

The case for completing Site C

Regardless of the decision, B.C. Hydro has spent $2.1 billion on the project that it cannot get back. It’s sunk. It’s irrelevant. What matters are the go-forward costs.

In announcing the decision, the government stated the newest estimate for Site C is that it will be a $10.7 billion project, including the amount spent. But if B.C. choses to terminate, it faces $1.8 billion in clean-up and other costs. So the decision is effectively whether B.C. Hydro wants to spend about $6.8 billion more to get Site C. At some price, completing Site C becomes a reasonable consideration. The question is whether $6.8 billion is low enough.

John Mayer hospitalized, rushed into surgery for emergency appendectomy

  John Mayer hospitalized, rushed into surgery for emergency appendectomy John Mayer was taken to the hospital for emergency surgery on Tuesday, his band Dead & Company announced on Twitter. “Early this morning, Tuesday, December 5th, John Mayer was admitted into the hospital for emergency appendectomy forcing the Dead & Company December 5th concert in New Orleans to be postponed,” the band wrote.No additional details were immediately provided. Mayer, 40, has been performing with Dead & Company since the band’s inception in 2015. The band includes former Grateful Dead members Bob Weir and Mickey Hart. Bill Kreutzmann, Oteil Burbridge and Jeff Chimenti are also in the band.

John Horgan disappoints both Site C opponents and supporters in northeast B. C . But it's one of the many reasons why it's hard to predict the long-term fallout from Horgan 's approval. B. C . government to go ahead with Site C hydroelectric dam project.

The latest Tweets from John Horgan (@Horganism). Why were their predictions wrong? John Horgan Retweeted Michael Moyer. Ouch, painful story. I got a job in academia 12 years ago in part because I hated the indignities of being a freelancer.https

The recent B.C. Utility Commission inquiry was an attempt to answer this question. The BCUC compared the cost of completion to an alternative portfolio consisting largely of wind and demand-side management (i.e. incentives to customers in exchange for the ability to curtail their demand in periods of tight supply conditions). For all intents and purposes, their conclusion was a tie. Site C’s cost was marginally lower (by roughly $300 million) but the difference is well within the bands of uncertainty.

However, many of the assumptions in the BCUC analysis appear to overvalue the alternative portfolio (e.g. wind plus demand management having the same reliability as  hydro) and undervalue Site C (e.g. no value for dispatchable “on demand” capacity, low value for surplus sales, etc.). Given the slant in assumptions and near toss-up in final numbers, a reading of the BCUC analysis favours completion. The possibility of having to quickly write-off termination and sunk costs in the case where Site C didn’t get the go ahead, meant the rate impacts of termination could be even worse.

Selena Gomez makes Instagram private

  Selena Gomez makes Instagram private Selena Gomez makes Instagram private Selena Gomez has made her Instagram account private, just one week after she was named the most followed person on the site for the second year running.The 25-year-old singer has shocked fans this week as she's made the move to close her profile on the photo sharing app to everyone who isn't already following her account.

Go . The final report on the Site C project from the B. C . Utilities Commission (BCUC) is expected on Tuesday. MLA Scott Fraser will be speaking to First Nations communities who are for and against the project before the final decision is made, Horgan added.

John Horgan (born 1953) is an American science journalist best known for his 1996 book The End of Science. He has written for many publications, including National Geographic, Scientific American, The New York Times, Time, Newsweek, and IEEE Spectrum.

The case for terminating Site C

There remains, however, very valid arguments against completion, despite the lower cost.

Firstly: continued cost overruns. The number one economic argument against completion should be the risk of continued cost overruns. If $10.7 billion becomes $12 billion, completing Site C becomes questionable. While it is difficult to mitigate future cost overruns, this is where the questions that Premier Horgan and energy and mines  minister Michelle Mungall direct at BC Hydro executives should be laser focussed.

The second reason to cancel is technological progress lowering the cost of alternatives. This is, seemingly, the reason the Green Party Leader, Andrew Weaver, went from outspoken supporter of large hydro a few years ago to outspoken critic today. And there is certainly validity in this argument. Costs of renewables have plummeted in the past 10 years. If storage technology follows a similar path, an alternative portfolio has merit. Terminating Site C exposes B.C. to the benefit of technology cost improvements.

There are also important social considerations. Many have questioned how completing Site C is consistent with UNDRIP and the Province’s commitment to reconciliation with First Nations. While some Indigenous groups have signed benefit-sharing arrangements, this is likely to remain a focal point of opposition to the project.

Rocket site shoots for 12 launches a year

  Rocket site shoots for 12 launches a year Rocket site shoots for 12 launches a yearProponents of the project gathered in a Halifax boardroom this morning to plan the next steps, which will rely first on the province approving an environmental assessment plan.

hydroelectric dam will go ahead Site C – The Dam of Self Sufficiency pathway for the controversial Site C hydroelectric dam up in the Peace to go ahead with SiteC is Why John Horgan deserves credit for going ahead with Site C Opinion: B. , flooding an 83-kilometre stretch of valley near Fort St

Premier John Horgan managed to disappoint both supporters and opponents of the Site C dam in northeast B. C . when he reluctantly approved the continuation of the multi-billion-dollar project on Monday. B. C . government to go ahead with Site C hydroelectric dam project.

What the analysis says about Site C

The answer to the Site C question is not so clear cut as polarized camps would have you believe. Which makes it all the more puzzling that camps are so polarized and resolute in their stances.

The answer, as usual (and perhaps unsatisfyingly), is: it depends. Taken at face value, the go-forward cost to complete Site C is lower than the cost of the alternative portfolio, making completion a reasonable choice. However, if one believes that the ultimate cost of Site C will continue to increase, while the cost of alternative technologies will decrease – a reasonable stance, given history – then termination can be justified, acknowledging uncertainties on both sides of that equation.

Reasonable people can disagree on where costs and the value of capacity are headed. But rather than passionately digging in to an unmoving position, dispassionate analysis—one capable of changing your position as facts change, or at least keeping an open mind—is necessary.

John Horgan demonstrated the ability to do just that, despite the likely political fallout that will result. While many won’t agree with the ultimate decision, he deserves credit for doing so, regardless of which “side” one is on.

MORE ABOUT JOHN HORGAN:

  • Why approving Site C is the B.C. NDP’s first serious political blunder
  • What electoral reform could look like in British Columbia
  • B.C.’s carbon-tax changes are covered in Green thumbprints
  • The NDP’s carbon tax increase puts B.C. on a very different path
  • B.C. NDP can’t break election promise on fundraising: experts
  • John Horgan to press for softwood dispute resolution in D.C.
  • John Horgan misses the premiers’ meeting, loses game of inches
  • How ‘the system’ failed B.C. voters

Happy Valley-Goose Bay commemorates late mayor John Hickey's life .
Mourners in Happy Valley-Goose Bay gathered Tuesday to say goodbye to their late mayor. John Hickey, 62, died Dec. 14, less than a week after he suffered an accidental gunshot wound to his face while out checking rabbit snares. Mourners filled the local Pentecostal Tabernacle on Tuesday afternoon, with extra chairs needing to be brought in. People lined up for a couple of hours ahead of the service so they could get a seat. Representatives of all three levels of government attended, RCMP flanking the aisle, and the service included a video commemoration of Hickey's life.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!