Canada N.S. kicks off New Year's Day polar bear dips

20:55  01 january  2018
20:55  01 january  2018 Source:   MSN

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Organizers cancelled two New Year ' s Day polar bear dips in Ontario because of the frigid temperatures, but not even a layer of ice could stop hundreds of jumpers from plunging into the freezing waters of Herring Cove

HALIFAX — Organizers cancelled two New Year ' s Day polar bear dips in Ontario because of the frigid temperatures, but not even a layer of ice could stop hundreds of jumpers from plunging into the freezing waters of Herring Cove, N . S . Just hours before it was scheduled to begin

HALIFAX - Organizers cancelled two New Year's Day polar bear dips in Ontario because of the frigid temperatures, but not even a layer of ice could stop hundreds of jumpers from plunging into the freezing waters of Herring Cove, N.S.

Just hours before it was scheduled to begin, organizers of the Courage Polar Bear Dip in Oakville, Ont., announced they were calling off the event because of "significant" ice and rock movement that would have made the plunge unsafe.

They said it was the first time in 33 years the event had been cancelled.

Toronto organizers cancelled their New Year's Day plunge on Sunday.

Meanwhile, the dip outside Halifax was only delayed a few minutes while a boat chipped away at a sheet of ice covering the wharf.

Frigid temperatures not the biggest worry at polar bear dips

  Frigid temperatures not the biggest worry at polar bear dips Frigid temperatures not the biggest worry at polar bear dipsAs some brave Nova Scotians undertake polar bear dips on New Year's Day amid frigid weather, an expert in how humans adapt to extreme temperatures says the biggest concern won't be the day's mercury reading.

HALIFAX — As daring swimmers in Halifax braved the frigid Atlantic Ocean to kick off a slew of polar bear plunges across Canada on New Year ' s Day , an Ontario club cancelled its event. Organizers of the Courage Polar Bear Dip in Oakville

HALIFAX — As daring swimmers in Halifax braved the frigid Atlantic Ocean to kick off a slew of polar bear plunges across Canada on New Year ' s Day , an Ontario club cancelled its event. Organizers of the Courage Polar Bear Dip in Oakville

But once the water was cleared, 83-year-old Arnie Ross took the inaugural leap with "2018" scrawled across his chest.

a man flying through the air while swimming in a body of water© Provided by thecanadianpress.com

The crowd chanted his name as Ross clawed up the icy ladder. He said the water was every bit as refreshing as it had been for his past 21 jumps.

"Twenty-two years," he exclaimed, flexing his muscles for the crowd.

About 250 jumpers followed the octogenarian into the ice-cold water, organizers said, including children as young as 10, international students and burly men donning Hawaiian skirts and kilts.

In spite of extreme cold warnings issued by Environment Canada that cover much of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and southern Quebec, many events were scheduled to go ahead.

Swimmers in Calgary, Vancouver and Victoria will take the plunge later in the day.

Bacteria makes blue jeans green .
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