Canada Boushie family to meet federal justice minister

16:21  10 february  2018
16:21  10 february  2018 Source:   MSN

'Bring drums': Boushie support rallies planned in Saskatoon, Regina after Stanley not-guilty verdict

  'Bring drums': Boushie support rallies planned in Saskatoon, Regina after Stanley not-guilty verdict 'Bring drums': Boushie support rallies planned in Saskatoon, Regina after Stanley not-guilty verdict People are gathering in Saskatoon, Regina and other Canadian cities Saturday to show their support for the family of Colten Boushie after Gerald Stanley, a Saskatchewan farmer, was acquitted Friday of responsibility for Boushie's death. "There is no justice!" yelled people in the courtroom after the jury foreman read out the verdict Friday night. Moments earlier, the presiding judge had urged calm despite the "raw emotions" felt by those in the room.

Federal Minister of Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said she shares the concerns about the lack of Indigenous people on juries. Boushie ‘s cousin, Jade Tootoosis, said it‘s not surprising but “extremely frustrating.” Eleanore Sunchild is advising the Boushie family .

Federal Minister of Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said she shares the concerns about the lack of Indigenous people on juries. (Facebook). The Boushie family say they were angered that all the Indigenous-looking jury candidates were challenged and excluded by Stanley's defence team.

a close up of a person© Provided by thecanadianpress.com BATTLEFORD, Sask. - The federal Justice Minister has said the country "can and must do better" after a white farmer was acquitted in the shooting death of a young Indigenous man — a verdict that sparked a firestorm of criticism from First Nations groups across Canada.

A jury in Battleford, Sask., deliberated 13 hours before finding Gerald Stanley not guilty of second degree murder Friday in the 2016 death of Colten Boushie, a resident of the Red Pheasant First Nation.

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould tweeted her sympathy for Boushie's family, adding that she is "committed to working everyday to ensure justice for all Canadians."

Prime Minister says he feels the pain of Boushie's family after not guilty verdict in Stanley trial

  Prime Minister says he feels the pain of Boushie's family after not guilty verdict in Stanley trial Prime Minister says he feels the pain of Boushie's family after not guilty verdict in Stanley trialThe not guilty verdict in Gerald Stanley’s trial brought a range of reactions from across the country during the weekend.

They carried signs saying " Justice for Colten," circulated letters to the Prime Minister about racism in He said he was hired by the Boushie family to represent their interests and hold police and After the meeting , about 20 family members gathered in Alvin's backyard to discuss the case.

Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Chief Bobby Cameron says he'll continue to press federal Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould on the topic this week. The Boushie family is calling for an out-of-province prosecutor to be brought in.

Red Pheasant First Nation Chief Clint Wuttunee called the ruling "absolutely perverse"

"Colten Boushie was shot in the back of the head at point blank range. Nevertheless an all white jury formed the twisted view of that obvious truth and found Stanley not guilty," he said

Wuttunee added that the verdict has "crushed the spirit" of the people of Red Pheasant First Nation.

Boushie's family had previously expressed concern that the deck was stacked against them during the court process.

Alvin Baptiste, Boushie's uncle, said there needs to be a change.

"Something has to be done about this. The government, Justin Trudeau, we ask you to give us Indigenous people justice," Baptiste said.

There was an almost immediate response from Ottawa.

Ministers say Canada must 'do better' after Boushie verdict

  Ministers say Canada must 'do better' after Boushie verdict Federal ministers say the country must do better for Indigenous peoples in the Canadian justice system after a Saskatchewan jury found Gerald Stanley not guilty of killing Colten Boushie. Justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould and Indigenous services minister Jane Philpott both posted on Twitter they want more to be done.Justin Trudeau echoed those statements, offering his condolences to Boushie's family. "I'm not going to comment on the process that led to this point today, but I am going to say we have come to this point as a country far too many times," he told reporters Saturday morning.

The Boushie family needs your help. To: Hon. Gordon Wyant, Q.C., Minister of Justice and Attorney General, and Bob Paulson, Commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The deaths of Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine were unique tragedies. He was the family hope, a dogged worker who dreamed of becoming a firefighter before he was shot on a farm in rural Saskatchewan. In a statement, federal Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould acknowledged that

"I can't imagine the grief and sorrow the Boushie family is feeling tonight," the prime minister tweeted from Los Angeles. "Sending love to them from the U.S."

"Devastating news tonight for the family & friends of #ColtenBoushie. My thoughts & prayers are with you in your time of grief & pain. We all have more to do to improve justice & fairness for Indigenous Canadians," tweeted Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott.

The head of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations held a late night news conference Friday as a result of the verdict.

With members of Colten Boushie's family standing behind him Chief Bobby Cameron reported he had heard from Ottawa.

"I had a telephone conversation (along with) Jade, and Alvin and the rest of the family, just 10 minutes ago," Cameron said.

"Jody Wilson is going to sit down with the family really quick to make some serious, positive change to meet the recommendations of the family."

Tories blast PM for comments on Boushie case

  Tories blast PM for comments on Boushie case OTTAWA - The federal Conservatives are accusing Justin Trudeau of "political interference," after the prime minister responded to the acquittal of a white farmer in the death of a young Indigenous man by saying the criminal justice system has to "do better." Trudeau made the comments after a jury in Battleford, Sask., Friday found Gerald Stanley not guilty of second-degree murder in the 2016 death of 22-year-old Colten Boushie, a resident of the Red Pheasant First Nation.

The Families for Justice organization she’s involved with has collected over 35,000 signatures on a petition calling for stricter regulations. Arsenault was scheduled to meet with former Justice Minister Rob Nicholson early last week. But the meeting was cancelled due to a federal cabinet shuffle.

The Boushie family has started a petition questioning the independence of the lead RCMP investigator and the Crown prosecutor, and criticizing the justice system's treatment of Indigenous people. The petition was endorsed last week by 2

Cameron didn't say what the changes might be but had earlier indicated an immediate appeal of the verdict and a public inquiry into the justice process during the trial.

He also told reporters that karma would eventually catch up with Stanley.

"Don't think for a second you've got away with this because sometime down the line you're going to pay."

Canadian throat singer Tanya Tagaq, from Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, had a brief comment on Twitter.

"There is no justice. You kill with impunity. Congratulations."

Perry Bellegarde, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, said there was no justice for Boushie.

"We will never give up on justice for First Nations in Saskatchewan or anywhere else in Canada," he wrote on Twitter. "Our Treaties are about maintaining peace and justice between Nations."

Kimberly Jonathan, a vice-chief with the FSIN said Indigenous people will continue pushing for change.

"We didn't want more here. We wanted justice. There will be an inquiry. We'd support that. And we will be going to the Hill and we will be speaking as loud and strong as we can," she said.

Trudeau promises justice system reform

  Trudeau promises justice system reform Trudeau promises justice system reformBut the prime minister says it would be "completely inappropriate" to comment on the specifics of last week's acquittal of a Saskatchewan farmer in the killing of 22-year-old Colten Boushie.

President Donald Trump’s meeting Tuesday with the Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak was decidedly swampy. Like Trump, Najib is under investigation by the US Justice Department. DOJ has filed lawsuits that allege the prime minister ’s family and associates stole more than

'Hopefully my family will heal after this trial.' (Richard Agecoutay). Protesters also regularly attended Stanley's pre-trial hearings, demanding justice for Boushie . Federal , Sask. agriculture ministers hope to grow pulse market. Another juror excused in 3-man murder trial in death of Reno Lee.

The Indigenous Joint Action Coalition called for a day of action Saturday to show "solidarity and support" for the Boushie and Baptiste family.

And rallies were scheduled for Saskatoon, Regina, Ottawa, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria.

The trial heard that Boushie was shot in the head while he was sitting in an SUV that had been driven onto Stanley's farm near Biggar, Sask.

The SUV driver testified the group had been drinking during the day and tried to break into a truck on a neighbouring farm, but went to the Stanley property in search of help with a flat tire.

Stanley, 56 testified that he fired warning shots to scare the group off. He said the fatal shot occurred when he reached into the SUV to grab the keys out of the ignition and his gun "just went off."

There were sobs of despair and cries of "murderer" in the courtroom Friday night when the not guilty verdict was read.

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Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version incorrectly stated that a not guilty plea sparked firestorm. It was the verdict that prompted backlash.

Kind, goofy Colten Boushie remembered by father .
Colten Boushie came into the world smiling. It was Halloween 1993 in Ronan, Mont., about 225 kilometres southeast of the Roosville Border Crossing in British Columbia. Pete Boushie still remembers how beautiful the baby's mother, Debbie Baptiste, was and how excited he was for the arrival of their third son. And he remembers the smile on the boy's face after he was born. They named him Colten Cale Boushie but he quickly became Co Co.The memory is as clear as the phone call he received in August 2016."My boy called me," Pete Boushie told The Canadian Press from his home on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in Montana.

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