The page you are looking for is temporarily unavailable.
Please try again later

Canada Bloc Quebecois rallies behind Ouellet

16:06  04 march  2018
16:06  04 march  2018 Source:   msn.com

Quebec's longest serving Quebec MNA announces retirement

  Quebec's longest serving Quebec MNA announces retirement François Gendron, who was first elected in 1976 alongside René Lévesque, is retiring from political life.   ​ The 72-year-old  Parti Québécois  MNA confirmed Saturday he will not run in the fall election. He was the longest-serving member of the National Assembly, having been elected 11 times over 42 years. Gendron has held various posts in the provincial government, including minister of education, natural resources and agriculture. He was also interim leader of the PQ and president of the National Assembly.

MONTREAL — The national office of the Bloc Quebecois threw its support behind its leader on Saturday, days after seven of the party’s 10 members of Parliament quit the caucus over Martine Ouellet ’s leadership style.

The national office of the Bloc Quebecois threw its support behind its leader on Saturday, March 3, 2018, days after seven of the party's 10 members of Parliament quit the caucus over Martine Ouellet 's leadership style.

a person smiling for the camera© Provided by thecanadianpress.com

MONTREAL - The national office of the Bloc Quebecois threw its support behind its leader on Saturday, days after seven of the party's 10 members of Parliament quit the caucus over Martine Ouellet's leadership style.

The party's administration made it clear that Ouellet had their support, despite an open letter published Friday in which more than 20 former Bloc Quebecois MPs called for her resignation.

"It is unanimously resolved that the national office renews its full and complete support of Martine Ouellet and relaunches the invitation she made to each of the resigning MPs to participate in a process to allow them to reintegrate the Bloc Quebecois caucus," Bloc member Benoit Lemieux said on behalf of the group.

Seven of 10 Bloc Quebecois caucus members quit over leader's style

  Seven of 10 Bloc Quebecois caucus members quit over leader's style Seven of the 10 Bloc Quebecois MPs quit Wednesday because of Martine Ouellet's leadership style, leaving the once-powerful party in complete disarray. The seven, who will sit as Independents, made the announcement after a Bloc caucus meeting in Ottawa.One of them is Louis Plamondon, who has been in the Commons since 1984, including the last 25 years as a Bloc MP.He said he is "leaving the leader" but "is not leaving the Bloc Quebecois.""I've witnessed many crises within the Bloc Quebecois and this is no doubt the deepest," Plamondon told reporters as he was flanked by the six other dissident MPs.

MONTREAL – The national office of the Bloc Quebecois is rallying behind its leader after seven of the party’s 10 members of Parliament quit the caucus earlier in the week. The party’s administration says Martine Ouellet has their full support.

The national office of the Bloc Quebecois is rallying behind its leader after seven of the party's 10 members of Parliament quit the caucus earlier in the week. The party's administration says Martine Ouellet has its full support.

Ouellet announced that the MPs who resigned will be able to keep their party memberships and are welcome to discuss returning to caucus.

"It was never a question of exclusion," she said at a news conference, flanked by the remaining party members.

"The resigning deputies can remain members of the Bloc Quebecois if they wish."

The seven MPs wrote a letter in Saturday's Journal de Montreal saying that excluding them from the party would contribute to its death.

The letter reiterated criticisms of Ouellet's leadership and said her choice to focus only on independence does not serve Quebec's interests.

"(Ouellet) adds, almost incidentally, that it is also necessary to defend the interests of Quebec, but that this is not the foundation of our presence in Ottawa," the letter read.

Martine Ouellet needs to resign, former Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe says

  Martine Ouellet needs to resign, former Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe says Martine Ouellet needs to resign, former Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe says Duceppe says Ouellet is weakening Quebec's voice in Ottawa and dividing sovereignists.

The national office of the Bloc Quebecois is rallying behind its leader after seven of the party's 10 members of Parliament quit the caucus earlier in the week. The party's administration says Martine Ouellet has its full support.

Martine Ouellet (born April 8, 1969) is a Canadian politician and the leader of Bloc Québécois (BQ). Ouellet graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering from McGill University in 1992 (exact date unknown), and gained a M.B.A from the HEC Montreal.

"On the contrary, we believe that to serve independence, the interests of Quebecers must be given priority. Without compromise. First and all the time."

But Ouellet remained steadfast in her commitment to independence on Saturday, adding that all the remaining members are on the same page regarding the party's future.

"A Bloc Quebecois that will work towards the promotion and preparation of independence, but also defending the rights of the Quebec nation," she said.

"For us, one doesn't go without the other."

The seven MPs who resigned stood by their position.

"We will meet in the next few days to evaluate all our options and to see how we can continue to serve Quebecers to the best of our capacity," the statement read.

On Friday, more than 20 former Bloc Quebecois MPs published an open letter in Le Devoir calling for Ouellet's resignation.

The letter, co-signed by ex-Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe, says Quebec's status is feeble within the Canadian federation, with a pro-Canada premier in Quebec City and an "intransigent" and divisive Bloc leader in Ottawa.

Support for Bloc Québécois at historic low: new poll .
A new opinion poll shows support for the Bloc Québécois has bottomed out, leaving it at risk of disappearing. Dissension within the party over the leadership of Martine Ouellet has eroded public support for the Bloc, which mustered just 12 per cent of voter intention in the poll conducted between March 5 and March 8 by the firm Léger for the Journal de Montréal.The newspaper published the results on Saturday, saying they represent a historic low for the party.The Léger poll also shows the Liberals and the Conservatives in a tie across the country, with 38 per cent voter intention apiece.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!