Canada Justin Trudeau rules out Canadian participation in military strikes against Syria

02:05  12 april  2018
02:05  12 april  2018 Source:   thestar.com

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OTTAWA—Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada 's military will not participate in expected strikes against the Syrian regime that are meant as retaliation for a suspected chemical attack against civilians. Speaking to Radio- Canada , the prime minister said Canadian military personnel

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada 's military will not participate in expected strikes against the Syrian regime that are meant as retaliation for a suspected chemical attack against civilians. Speaking to Radio- Canada , the prime minister said Canadian military personnel are

Canadian CF-18 Hornets depart after refueling over Iraq on Oct. 30, 2014. The fighters jets were in the region flying bombing mission against Daesh extremists in Iraq but that mission was ended by Trudeau’s government after it took office in 2015.© Staff Sgt. Perry Aston Canadian CF-18 Hornets depart after refueling over Iraq on Oct. 30, 2014. The fighters jets were in the region flying bombing mission against Daesh extremists in Iraq but that mission was ended by Trudeau’s government after it took office in 2015.

OTTAWA—Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada's military will not participate in expected strikes against the Syrian regime that are meant as retaliation for a suspected chemical attack against civilians.

Speaking to Radio-Canada, the prime minister said Canadian military personnel are already involved in missions in northern Iraq and Latvia and will be deploying to Mali. “We are not looking to be present in Syria,” Trudeau said in an interview.

Trudeau voices support for strikes on Syria

  Trudeau voices support for strikes on Syria LIMA, Peru - Canada stood behind its closest allies on Friday as the U.S., Britain and France launched airstrikes against Syria's government in retaliation for a suspected chemical-weapons attack that killed dozens of people. U.S. President Donald Trump announced the strikes in a national address, and promised Washington was prepared to "sustain" pressure on the Syrian government until it stopped killing its own people with banned weapons. Reporters U.S. President Donald Trump announced the strikes in a national address, and promised Washington was prepared to "sustain" pressure on the Syrian government until it stopped killing its own people with banned weapons.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says that Canada ’s military will not participate in expected strikes against the Syrian regime that are meant as retaliation for a suspected chemical attack against civilians. Speaking to Radio- Canada , the prime minister said Canadian military personnel are

Canada . The Canadian prime minister, Justin Trudeau , who this week ruled out his country’s participation in military action in Syria , announced Iraq. The strikes carried out by the US, France and Britain against Syrian military targets could give terrorism an opportunity to expand in the region

But he said Canada has been involved in delivering humanitarian assistance and working through diplomatic and political channels to resolve the conflict in Syria that has laid waste to cities, left thousands dead and forced citizens to flee to safety in neighbouring countries.

U.S. President Donald Trump warned Wednesday of an imminent strike on Syria, declaring on social media that missiles “will be coming” and taunted Russia for its pledge to shoot them down.

“Get ready Russia, because they will be coming, nice and new and “smart!” Trump said on Twitter.

The threatened action comes after an attack last weekend in the Syrian town of Douma that possibly involved chemical weapons, which is believed to have killed 40 people. The attack is blamed on the government of President Bashar al-Assad though it has denied responsibility.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada supports the decision by the U.S., the United Kingdom and France to bomb targets in Syria over the Assad regime's alleged use of chemical weapons. Trudeau has previously ruled out any Canadian participation in military action.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau expressed his support of the joint military action by U.S., U.K. and France against Syria announced late Friday night. While Trump announced the “precision strikes ” in Syria , Trudeau has ruled out any Canadian participation .

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland condemned the attack at the time, saying the “repeated and morally reprehensible use of chemical weapons” by the Assad regime has been confirmed by independent observers.

“Canada condemns the Assad regime — and its backers, Russia and Iran — for its repeated, gross violations of human rights and continued, deliberate targeting of civilians,” Freeland said in a statement.

Trump has spoken to world leaders and U.S. officials said the U.S., France and Britain discussed the possibility of a military strike, according to a report by The Associated Press.

Canada did have CF-18 fighters jets in the region flying bombing mission against Daesh extremists in Iraq. That mission — launched by the previous Conservative government — was halted by Trudeau’s Liberal government after it took office in 2015.

Currently, Canada has a small number of special operations forces troops still deployed in northern Iraq to assist local forces in their fight against Daesh, along with Griffon helicopters. A CC-150 Polaris air-to-air refueller is also still flying missions, refuelling other fighters in their patrol missions.

Returning ISIS members pose potential chemical weapons risk: internal government documents .
The issue is one of complexities facing police and security agencies preparing for the return of Canadians who traveled to Syria and Iraq to join terrorist groups.ISIS members who return to Canada from Syria and Iraq could have knowledge of chemical weapons and put it to use in a terrorist attack, according to internal government documents obtained by Global News.

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