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Canada Fatality inquiry probing disabled man's in-custody death

08:57  05 june  2018
08:57  05 june  2018 Source:   edmontonjournal.com

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Maureen Harland and her son Trevor Proudman, when he was 15. He suffocated in a police van last year because of a medical condition made worse because his hands were handcuffed behind his back.© Bruce Edwards Maureen Harland and her son Trevor Proudman, when he was 15. He suffocated in a police van last year because of a medical condition made worse because his hands were handcuffed behind his back.

The in-custody death of 32-year-old disabled man was being examined during a fatality inquiry that began Monday.

During opening statements in an Edmonton provincial courtroom, the inquiry heard that on Nov. 12, 2014, Trevor Proudman was at a foot clinic in the city when he became agitated.

Staff called police, who attended and placed Proudman under arrest. He was handcuffed and placed in the back of a van. When officers checked on Proudman 23 minutes later, he was found facedown and unresponsive, court heard.

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Proudman was taken to hospital, where he died November 13, 2014. A report from the medical examiner deemed the manner of death “accidental.”

During the inquiry, court will hear evidence from several witnesses, including police, staff from the foot clinic, and support workers who worked with Proudman.

Proudman’s family in 2016 filed a statement of claim against Edmonton police in connection to his death.

In that claim, the family said Proudman had Prader-Willi Syndrome, which is both a physical and cognitive disorder, and he required the assistance of a full-time support worker. It also says he was five-foot-four, weighed 282 pounds and had an unusually small chest cavity due to his obesity and scoliosis.

Allegations made in a statement of claim have not been proven in court.

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Elizabeth Wettlaufer was called ‘angel of death’ by co-worker, inquiry hears .
A staff member at the Caressant Care nursing home once referred to her co-worker, Elizabeth Wettlaufer, as an “angel of death,” a public inquiry has heard.The chilling term, which popularly refers to serial killers who are caregivers, was used while Wettlaufer was still employed at the Woodstock, Ont., nursing home where she killed seven people in her care and assaulted two others with overdoses of insulin.Registered nurse Karen Routledge, who worked at Caressant, recalled today a conversation where a co-worker used that term to describe Wettlaufer, who co-workers called Beth.

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