Canada Promising champion bull rider, 25, found dead — Canada’s rodeo community in mourning

21:51  10 january  2017
21:51  10 january  2017 Source:   National Post

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Ty Pozzobon: Ty <span style=Pozzobon had 14 top 10 finishes on the Professional Bull Riding circuit." src="/upload/images/real/2017/01/10/ty-pozzobon-ty-nbsp-span-style-font-size-13px-pozzobon-had-14-top-10-finishes-on-the-professional-bu_533719_.jpg" /> © JORDAN VERLAGE/Postmedia Ty Pozzobon had 14 top 10 finishes on the Professional Bull Riding circuit.

A high-ranking bull rider from Merritt, B.C., who rode with borrowed gear at the Calgary Stampede last year after his was stolen, has died at age 25.

Although it’s not clear how Ty Pozzobon died, a short statement on Elite Rodeo Athletes said “thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends” of Pozzobon.

“He will be truly missed by the entire rodeo community.”

Also, a statement from the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association said the bull riding community is “deeply saddened by his death.”

Pozzobon created a stir at the 2016 Stampede when his gear was stolen from his parents’ vehicle outside a downtown Calgary restaurant. He was able to compete using gear handed down from a pair of former Canadian bull riding champions, Chad Besplug and Tyler Thomson.

Pozzobon had 14 top 10 finishes on the Professional Bull Riding circuit, with career earnings of more than $250,000. He performed four times at the Calgary Stampede. He was a three-time Canadian Finals Rodeo qualifier, the 2016 Canadian Professional Bull Riders champion and a four-time world finalist.

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