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Sports It’s the business, not the basketball, that drives March Madness

18:35  14 march  2018
18:35  14 march  2018 Source:   thestar.com

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March Madness will bring the NCAA nearly 0 million in broadcast fees this year alone. Bridges’ coach, Tom Izzo, earns .1 million annually in base salary. Meanwhile, college basketball ’ s underground economy draws FBI scrutiny because it recognizes what the NCAA won’t concede

It ’ s the business , not the basketball , that drives March Madness . (Julie Jacobson/The associated Press). Auburn's Bryce Brown pauses during a game on March 9. The team will have one of the longest treks for its game in San Diego.


Michigan State sophomore Miles Bridges is slated to take the floor in Detroit on Friday, as his team plays Bucknell in the first round of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament. But less than a month ago, the star guard’s name surfaced in a pay-for-play scandal implicating some of college basketball’s marquee programs.

Details of the FBI probe, made public in a Yahoo! Sports story, included archetypes and allegations that often underlie NCAA violations: assistant coaches and shoe company reps discussing six-figure sums to steer players to certain schools. And the investigation included Bridges, whose mom had accepted a free lunch worth $70 from a coach recruiting her son. The act violated the NCAA’s amateurism rules, and Bridges paid $40 to charity to avoid suspension.

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North Carolina’ s Joel Berry drives past Grayson Allen of Duke during the the ACC Tournament in Brooklyn on Friday. Al Bello/Getty Images. Big-time college basketball wouldn’t exist if March Madness weren’t so popular. That’ s just the way it is.

My favorite annual sports event is March Madness (that’ s the NCAA basketball tournament for you non-sports fans), and it ’ s particularly exciting when my alma mater’s team is in the running.

If disciplining a player for a meal he didn’t even consume seems petty, that’s because it is.

The college sports industry enriches a long list of people that still doesn’t include players. March Madness will bring the NCAA nearly $880 million in broadcast fees this year alone. Bridges’ coach, Tom Izzo, earns $4.1 million annually in base salary. Meanwhile, college basketball’s underground economy draws FBI scrutiny because it recognizes what the NCAA won’t concede — that players who generate revenue deserve compensation beyond scholarships, and that a reckoning on player payment is growing inevitable.

The NCAA has maintained paying players would damage the integrity of college sport, but treating Bridges’ free lunch as an illicit benefit doesn’t highlight the virtues of amateurism. It exposes the absurdity of rules that don’t limit coaching salaries but legislate who can buy a player a meal.

Bloated field, the sameness of play lessens the Madness

  Bloated field, the sameness of play lessens the Madness A few little things for early in the week.At its most basic, I think we can all concur that March Madness is not a bad idea, the drama of win-or-go home makes it unique and can provide some compelling stories.I’m sure I’ll see a buzzer-beater or two and get caught up in some game that has Minnow vs. Whale in some unlikely possible upset sometime during the tournament.And if Minnow keeps moving on, that becomes rather compelling and a nice continuing story.But, still …I can make the case that it’s been ruined by NCAA greed, I don’t think there’s any reason for early week “play in” games, it’s become this gigantic money-maker that goes on too long now, involves too many suspect teams and t

I know absolutely nothing about college basketball . I fake interest in it when it comes up in conversation, and I nod my head as if I know what is happening in a game. This year, my interest in March Madness was only piqued because of the chance to w…

It ’ s time to turn around the assumption that companies are going to lose money during March Madness . With a bit of advance planning and critical thinking, your business can attract basketball megafans.

If the NCAA isn’t prepared to enact changes, some conferences are.

The Pac-12 revealed recommendations Monday of a task force it convened last year to tackle corruption in basketball recruiting. Suggestions include enabling freer communication between college players and pro agents, and compelling the NBA to abandon its minimum age rule. The New York Times reports that the league and the NBA Players’ Association have both met with the task force, and ESPN has reported that the league wants to abolish the rule excluding players younger than 20.

Removing the NBA’s minimum age, which essentially forces top prospects to play at least one season in college, could trigger profound changes for stakeholders benefitting from major college sports’ status quo.

The NCAA, for one, makes an average of $771 million annually on March Madness broadcast rights, with average annual rights fees set to top $1 billion by 2025. Football playoffs bring in an average of $467 million a year in broadcast fees from ESPN.

Six coaches you can bank on in March Madness

  Six coaches you can bank on in March Madness Whom can you trust when you’re filling out your brackets? Even the best teams can fall victim to big upsets. Duke, for instance, has been defeated by the likes of Lehigh and Mercer in the first round under Mike Krzyzewski. Sometimes, you just have to look to a coach who has a great record of success in the NCAA Tournament — or a penchant for advancing past certain rounds with remarkable consistency. Here are six safe coaches to bank on in March Madness. 1) Roy Williams, North Carolina Williams’ third national title in 2017 solidified him as one of the all-time great college coaches — if he wasn’t already, that is. It’s really quite amazing to think that he arrived at North Carolina hindered by a reputation of being unable to win the big one. He’s certainly shed it in the decade and a half since coming to Chapel Hill. Let’s start with one amazing stat: Williams has never lost in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. He’s been there 27 times dating back to 1989, and he’s a perfect 27-0 in tournament openers, even with his lesser squads over the years. When you consider that every single one of his rivals, from Coach K to Cal and everyone in between, has tripped up at least once, that’s simply amazing. He’s made the tournament 13 times with the Tar Heels and made it to the second weekend in nine of those runs, with five Final Four appearances to go with them. It’s been an up and down year for North Carolina, but Williams is a steady hand at the helm you can count on.

Here are eight great March Madness apps worth loading into your tablet or smartphone Though it overs all major sports, the app excels in its college basketball coverage, with links to breaking news, its blog, and expert picks.

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Conferences and individual schools also cash in. The Big Ten Network generated a reported $400 million in 2017, while the University of Texas brought in a reported $182.1 million in 2016.

Five years ago, an underdog squad Florida Gulf Coast University reached the men’s basketball tournament’s round of 16, giving the commuter school rare time in the national spotlight. The following year, applications reportedly rose by 35 per cent.

NBA teams, meanwhile, dodge the cost of running comprehensive farm systems by compelling players to develop in college. And each year the league brings in a class of draftees who bring their NCAA fame to the NBA, easing the marketing burden on their pro teams. The NFL similarly bars players until three years after graduating high school, forcing them to bolster a multibillion-dollar college football enterprise while working toward pro careers.

That the most rigid rules around amateurism only apply to football and men’s basketball — often euphemized as “revenue sports” — isn’t a coincidence. Neither are the age limits imposed by pro leagues grown comfortable downloading the cost of grooming young talent to NCAA programs. The directives purport to safeguard student-athletes and the pristine ideal of amateurism, but above all they protect business.

Kentucky’s Hamilton-bred star has taken a crazy road to March Madness

  Kentucky’s Hamilton-bred star has taken a crazy road to March Madness When Hamilton’s soon-to-be-most-famous athlete walks onto the court to open March Madness on Thursday, there will be endless chatter about where he’s going to go in the upcoming NBA draft. Most agree it’ll be in the first round. Some are even predicting the top 10.It’s just affirmation that Shai Gilgeous-Alexander is indeed a special talent.But when Stef Giovannangeli watches the six-foot-six point guard play for Kentucky, he can’t help but think of the skinny Grade 9 kid with the giant feet who fell to him as head coach of the St. Thomas More midget squad six years ago.“He didn’t make the junior team,” Giovannangeli chuckles.That’s right, a guy who was just named MVP of his conference tournament and who

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On this week’ s episode, we take a look at the multibillion-dollar business that drives NCAA March Madness after a wild opening weekend for the college basketball tournament.

Michigan State's Miles Bridges was all smiles with the Big Ten regular-season championship trophy. But he had to to pay $40 to charity to avoid suspension after it was discovered his mother had accepted a free lunch from a recruiter.© Al Goldis Michigan State's Miles Bridges was all smiles with the Big Ten regular-season championship trophy. But he had to to pay $40 to charity to avoid suspension after it was discovered his mother had accepted a free lunch from a recruiter.

In sports that don’t generate nine-figure paydays for the NCAA, the public easily accepts teenagers who skip college to compete professionally.

Imagine the WTA telling a teenage Serena Williams to spend two years on scholarship before joining the tour. Or envision the IAAF banning a 21-year-old Usain Bolt from the Diamond League because he hadn’t finished a mandatory post-high school waiting period.

Those scenarios sound as outlandish as Barcelona suspending a 16-year-old Lionel Messi from its B-team because an agent bought him a sandwich.

The NCAA, NFL and NBA have successfully peddled the notion that education is sacrosanct and paid apprenticeships taboo. The idea has grown so pervasive that the FBI devoted resources to micromanaging basketball amateurism, ensnaring Bridges over his mom’s free lunch.

But the NBA’s and the union’s willingness to revisit the age requirement hint that both organizations realize arbitrary rules governing amateurism drive players to turn pro overseas, or spend an extra year in prep schools before entering the draft. Both those moves diminish the star power players bring with them to the league.

And the Pac-12’s push for reform signals recognition that an amateur system enriching everyone but the talent must evolve to head off future scandals.

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