Technology Scientists Watch A Black Hole Collide With A Neutron Star

06:55  03 august  2017
06:55  03 august  2017 Source:   International Business Times

The Most Explosive, Energetic Events in the Universe

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When a black hole and a neutron star collide , it might shower outer space with precious metals like gold and platinum while spewing out radioactive elements. Read: Scientists Watch a Star Become a Black Hole . For there to be a collision between a black hole and a neutron star , there first has to

The neutron star collision video, which was produced by scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is a supercomputer simulation. Neutron Stars Tear Each Other To Shreds, Black Hole Ensues | Visualization. When Neutron Stars Collide - Titanic Energy Released.

This image from a computer simulation shows the result of a collision between a neutron star and a black hole, with a disk of matter forming around the larger black hole that has been created.  © Provided by IBT US This image from a computer simulation shows the result of a collision between a neutron star and a black hole, with a disk of matter forming around the larger black hole that has been created.  When a black hole and a neutron star collide, it might shower outer space with precious metals like gold and platinum while spewing out radioactive elements.

Scientists saw this in computer simulations as they were trying to learn what happens when these two dense objects merge. They hope being able to predict the result of these collisions will help them find the real thing as they scan the skies with their instruments, as well as better understand the role neutron stars play in the universe.

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The neutron star collision video, which was produced by scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is a supercomputer simulation. "The black hole 's event horizon — its point of no return — is shown by the gray sphere. Two neutron stars collide in a new video produced by NASA.

Scientists hope to use neutrino experiments to watch a black hole form. In the textbook case, matter rebounds and erupts, leaving a neutron star . But sometimes, the supernova fails, and there’s no explosion; instead, a black hole is born.

For there to be a collision between a black hole and a neutron star, there first has to be a big bang — a neutron star is what remains after a massive, old star explodes in a supernova, the biggest kind of explosion there is in outer space. The collapsed star core that is left behind is the neutron star.

It’s also possible that neutron stars themselves further collapse to create black holes. Either way, both neutron stars and black holes are incredibly dense, with tremendous masses packed into relatively small spaces. When they come together, the result is powerful.

The international team of scientists detailed their findings in two studies in the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity, with one paper focusing on what occurs during the first milliseconds of the collision and the other on what follows, as material is ejected and immediately forms a disk around the crash site.

Did Quasars Halt Star Formation In Early Massive Galaxies?

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It’s expected to reach its closest approach to the black hole next month, and science , in a first, will be able to watch the encounter in real time. Sometimes, as a massive star burns off all of its fuel, it collapses into a fantastically tiny, tremendously dense object called a neutron star .

The sound of two black holes colliding Most astronomers predicted that pairs of neutron stars would be observed before black - hole pairs, so their continued absence would present a challenge to theorists. Watch the battle unfold as these huge hornets risk their lives for their kingdoms.

The results of the simulations varied, with some run-throughs of the collisions showing the black holes completely consuming the neutron stars and others showing it burping out varying amounts of material after its meal, the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory reported. When the two objects join forces, they turn into one larger black hole, and that monster might eat up some of the material that was spewed out or leave some of the radioactive matter hanging there in “an extremely dense, thin, donut-shaped halo of matter” that quickly spreads out.

  Scientists Watch A Black Hole Collide With A Neutron Star © Provided by IBT US Heavy elements are likely in that ejected matter, including gold, platinum and radioactive elements.

According to the lab, the simulations are about more than just creating a gruesome image of an enormous crash. They are also geared toward helping detect gravitational waves — disturbances in spacetime that stem from violent events — that result from these collisions so scientists could one day watch the real thing and learn more about our universe. Gravitational waves were recently discovered to be linked to two black holes crashing together, although a collision between a black hole and a neutron star would not create gravitational waves that are as strong.

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Scientists think neutron star smashups like this one produce short gamma-ray bursts that last for less than two seconds, but unleash as much energy as all the stars in the Milky Way emit in a year. NASA eyes up supermassive black holes , neutron stars .

Luckily, we can tell the difference between the two possible outcomes of a neutron star collision observationally. If we manage to spot a pair of neutron stars colliding and they collapse into a black hole , they’re going to emit a blinding gamma ray burst across the galaxy.

“We are trying to move more toward actually making models of the gravitational-wave signals produced by these mergers,” researcher Francois Foucart said in the lab statement.

The findings might also offer insight about resulting gamma ray bursts and radioactive material that telescopes might pick up while scanning the skies.

The lab says looking at matter that is spewed out when these simulated objects crash into one another, including its speed, size and composition, will assist astronomers who are searching the universe for real collisions to observe.

Neutron stars are also quite mysterious, and better understanding how they rip apart in a collision with a black hole could give scientists a window into their structure.

“With improved models,” scientist Daniel Kasen said in the statement, “we are better able to tell the observers exactly which flashes of light are the signals they are looking for.”

Starburst Galaxy Could Produce Gravitational Waves .
Astronomers are studying IC 10, a starburst galaxy first observed 130 years ago. It has over a dozen black holes and neutron stars that exist in binary X-ray systems.A starburst galaxy — so-called because of the intense activity of star formation taking place in it — named IC 10 was first discovered 130 years ago. Located about 2.2 billion light-years from Earth, the small galaxy is home to over a dozen black holes and neutron stars that exist in “X-ray binary” systems. The systems are referred to as such because they involve a black hole or a neutron star feeding gas off younger, massive companions and emitting large amounts of X-ray light.

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