Technology Google's AlphaGo AI can teach itself to master games like chess

14:07  07 december  2017
14:07  07 december  2017 Source:   Engadget

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Google ' s DeepMind team has already advanced its AlphaGo AI to dominate Go without human input, but now the system is clever enough to master other Chess and Shogi were relatively easy tests, as they're simpler than Go. It'll be another thing entirely to tackle complex video games like StarCraft II

AlphaGo , the board- game -playing AI built by Google ' s DeepMind subsidiary, just got a huge update, making it smarter — and potentially creepier — than ever before. The AI taught itself to play the game at a higher level than any human player, running on marathon sessions where it played against

Lee Sedol standing on a stage holding a microphone© Provided by Engadget Google's DeepMind team has already advanced its AlphaGo AI to dominate Go without human input, but now the system is clever enough to master other board games without intervention. Researchers have developed a more generalized system for AlphaGo Zero that can train itself to achieve "superhuman" skill in chess, Shogi (a Japanese classic) and other game types knowing only the rules, all within less than a day. It doesn't need example games or other references.

This doesn't mean that DeepMind has developed a truly general purpose, independent AI... yet. Chess and Shogi were relatively easy tests, as they're simpler than Go. It'll be another thing entirely to tackle complex video games like StarCraft II, let alone fuzzier concepts like walking or abstract thought. There's also the question of speed: less than 24 hours works for board games, but that's too slow for situations where AI needs to adapt on the spot.

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And the ability of Google ' s AI to master Go, a game with more than 300 times the number of plays as chess , is indicative of AlphaGo 's sophisticated pattern recognition.

Google ' s DeepMind lab has built an artificially intelligent program that taught itself to become one of the world's It took AlphaGo Zero just three days to beat an earlier AI program ( AlphaGo Lee), which had resoundingly beaten After 21 days of playing, AlphaGo Zero defeated AlphaGo Master , an

Even so, this is a major step toward AI that can accomplish any task with only minimal instructions. Robots and self-driving cars in particular may need to learn how to navigate unfamiliar environments without the luxury of pre-supplied training material. If nothing else, chess champions have one more reason to be nervous.

ArXiv.org

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