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Technology Intel says performance impact of security updates not significant

17:06  05 january  2018
17:06  05 january  2018 Source:   reuters.com

Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info

  Intel reveals chip design flaw that could have allowed hackers to access hidden info Hardware and software manufacturers including Apple and Microsoft began pushing out patches that protected against attacks making use of the flaw. The flaw, which Intel dubbed a side-channel analysis attack,  was discovered "months ago" Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said on CNBC Wednesday. The discovery was made by researchers at Google's Project Zero security group, which reported it to the affected companies. The vulnerabilities undermine some of the most fundamental security constraints employed by modern computers, said Craig Young, a researcher at computer security company Tripwire.

The performance impact of the recent security updates should not be significant and will be mitigated over time, Intel said late on Thursday, adding that Apple Inc ( AAPL.O ), Amazon.com Inc ( AMZN.O ), Google ( GOOGL.O ) and Microsoft Corp ( MSFT.O

Intel said fixes for security issues in its microchips would not slow down computers, rebuffing concerns that the flaws found in microprocessors would significantly reduce performance . The performance impact of the recent security updates should not be significant and will be mitigated over time

a sign on the side of a building: FILE PHOTO: An Intel logo is seen at the company's offices in Petah Tikva near Tel Aviv© REUTERS/Nir Elias/File Photo FILE PHOTO: An Intel logo is seen at the company's offices in Petah Tikva near Tel Aviv Intel Corp said fixes for security issues in its microchips would not slow down computers, rebuffing concerns that the flaws found in microprocessors would significantly reduce performance.

The performance impact of the recent security updates should not be significant and will be mitigated over time, Intel said late on Thursday, adding that Apple Inc, Amazon.com Inc, Google and Microsoft Corp reported little to no performance impact from the security updates.

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Tech firms battle to resolve major security flaw

  Tech firms battle to resolve major security flaw Amazon, Google and now Apple as the list of digital giants hit by the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" computer security flaws grows longer, the race is on to limit the damage. "All Mac systems and iOS devices are affected, but there are no known exploits impacting customers at this time," Apple -- whose devices are usually regarded as secure -- said in a post on an online support page on Thursday.Amost all microprocessors produced over the past 10 years by Intel, AMD and ARM are affected.

Intel is working to patch the vulnerability and said the average computer user will not experience significant slowdowns as it is fixed. According to AppleInsider, "multiple sources within Apple" have said that updates made in macOS 10.13.2 have mitigated "most" security concerns associated with

Intel Corp said fixes for security issues in its microchips would not slow down computers, rebuffing concerns that the flaws found in microprocessors would significantly reduce performance . The performance impact of the recent security updates should not be significant and will be mitigated

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Intel shares fell nearly 2 percent on Thursday as investors were worried about the potential financial liability and reputational damage from the recently disclosed security issues.

The largest chipmaker confirmed earlier this week that the security issues reported by researchers in the company's widely used microprocessors could allow hackers to steal sensitive information from computers, phones and other devices.

Security researchers had disclosed two security flaws exposing vulnerability of nearly every modern computing device containing chips from Intel, Advanced Micro Devices Inc and ARM Holdings.

Flawed computer chips and how to fix them

  Flawed computer chips and how to fix them As tech giants race against the clock to fix major security flaws in microprocessors, many users are wondering what lurks behind unsettling names like "Spectre" or "Meltdown" and what can be done about this latest IT scare.  What is Meltdown? And Spectre?

SAN FRANCISCO - Intel Corp said fixes for security issues in its microchips would not slow down computers, rebuffing concerns that the flaws found in microprocessors would significantly reduce performance .

The performance impact of the recent security updates should not be significant and will be mitigated over time, Intel said late on Thursday, adding that Apple Inc , Amazon.com Inc , Google and Microsoft Corp reported little to no performance impact from the security updates . http

The first, called Meltdown, affects Intel chips and lets hackers bypass the hardware barrier between applications run by users and the computer's memory, potentially letting hackers read a computer's memory and steal passwords. The second, called Spectre, affects chips from Intel, AMD and ARM and lets hackers potentially trick otherwise error-free applications into giving up secret information.

Intel had said the issues were not caused by a design flaw and asked users to download a patch and update their operating system.

Intel may be on the hook for costs stemming from lawsuits claiming that the patches would slow computers and effectively force consumers to buy new hardware, and big customers will likely seek compensation from Intel for any software or hardware fixes they make, security experts said.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru; Editing by Amrutha Gayathri)

Finnish firm detects new Intel security flaw .
A new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday. F-Secure said in a statement that the flaw had nothing to do with the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" vulnerabilities recently found in the micro-chips that are used in almost all computers, tablets and smartphones today.

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