Technology This Tiny Sensor on Tooth Can Reveal What You Eat

14:57  25 march  2018
14:57  25 march  2018 Source:   Newsweek

HP’s tiny laser printers are the length of a pencil

  HP’s tiny laser printers are the length of a pencil Today, HP revealed the LaserJet Pro M15 and M28 series, which are the smallest laser printers in their class. These tiny printers are about the length of a No. 2 pencil, yet still are able to print 18–19 pages per minute. These printers are also mobile-optimized; thanks to the HP Smart App, users can control the printer entirely from their smartphones. The printer supports Apple AirPrint, Google Cloud Print, WiFi Direct and is Mopria certified.

That could soon change thanks to new, miniaturized sensors developed by researchers at the Tufts University School of Engineering that, when mounted directly on a tooth and Together, the three layers act like a tiny antenna, collecting and transmitting waves in the radiofrequency spectrum.

Together, the three layers act like a tiny antenna, collecting and transmitting waves in the radiofrequency spectrum. Tseng P, Napier B, Garbarini L, Kaplan DL and Omenetto F. “Functional, RF-trilayer sensors for tooth -mounted, wireless monitoring of the oral cavity and food consumption”

A dentist, who is not involved in the research described in this article, is pictured holding up a plaster cast of a patient's teeth. A new tooth sensor, designed by engineers at Tufts University, allows doctors and researchers alike to track patients' food and drink intake.© SEAN GALLUP/GETTY IMAGES A dentist, who is not involved in the research described in this article, is pictured holding up a plaster cast of a patient's teeth. A new tooth sensor, designed by engineers at Tufts University, allows doctors and researchers alike to track patients' food and drink intake. It’s not easy to remember what you ate a week ago or even the day of, but a new tiny sensor could help doctors keep track of patients’ diets.

The sensor, which is designed to be mounted on a tooth, measures 2mm x 2mm, according to a statement from Tufts University. It’s able to communicate wirelessly through devices, such as smartphone, and can provide information regarding glucose, salt and alcohol intake.

Huawei's P20 Pro reportedly packs a 40MP camera

  Huawei's P20 Pro reportedly packs a 40MP camera Do you still have a hole in your heart where Nokia's camera-centric Lumia 1020 used to be? The Pro would offer the equivalent of 3X optical zoom through its telephoto lens, and is expected to shoot 960 frames per second slow motion. Whether that's brief slow-mo like the Galaxy S9 or continuous like the Xperia XZ2 isn't clear. The front camera reportedly snaps 24-megapixel images for those who need extra-detailed selfies.

Scientists have designed a way to precisely monitor the food we eat using a sensor on our tooth . They have designed a tiny , wireless sensor that can be attached to a tooth . Researchers reveal that fructose is primarily processed in the small intestine, not the liver.

That could soon change thanks to new, miniaturized sensors developed by researchers at the Tufts University School of Engineering that, when mounted directly on a tooth and Together, the three layers act like a tiny antenna, collecting and transmitting waves in the radiofrequency spectrum.

Although it’s miniature, it’s sure to be noticed considering it’s not white, but rather gold in color. In a photo published by Tufts, the sensor is seen placed on the center surface of a front tooth. It’s unclear whether it’s able to mount to the back of a tooth or a tooth not visible when you smile.

When the user eats certain foods, it’s able to change “color” to allow those monitoring the data to detect what was ate. For example, if salt or alcohol is consumed, a layer of the sensor will turn a different hue of radiofrequency waves.

“In theory we can modify the bioresponsive layer in these sensors to target other chemicals – we are really limited only by our creativity,” Fiorenzo Omenetto, study author and engineering professor at Tufts, said in a statement. “We have extended common [radiofrequency ID] technology to a sensor package that can dynamically read and transmit information on its environment, whether it is affixed to a tooth, to skin, or any other surface.”

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 To Feature In-Display Fingerprint Sensor

  Samsung Galaxy Note 9 To Feature In-Display Fingerprint Sensor Industry sources are claiming that Samsung’s upcoming Galaxy Note 9 phablet will come with an in-display fingerprint reader. Samsung Electronics failed to launch a flagship smartphone with an in-display fingerprint scanner last year. This year’s Galaxy S9 also did not debut with such an advanced biometric system. So now the South Korea giant is looking to realize the goal with its upcoming Galaxy Note 9 flagship phablet.

Together, the three layers act like a tiny antenna, collecting and transmitting waves in the radiofrequency spectrum. Tags: Industry News, Product Resource: Industry News, Food and Beverage, Clinical, Engineering, teeth , sensors , biosensors, nutrition, Diet, tracking sensors .

Together, the three layers act like a tiny antenna, collecting and transmitting waves in the radiofrequency spectrum. Tseng P, Napier B, Garbarini L, Kaplan DL and Omenetto F. "Functional, RF-trilayer sensors for tooth -mounted, wireless monitoring of the oral cavity and food consumption"

Omenetto and his colleagues research, which is scheduled to be published in the journal Advanced Materials, outlines how the sensor functions. It’s composed of three thin layers: a middle one which absorbs and tracks data and two surrounding gold layers. They all work together like a “tiny antenna,” according to the statement.

The researchers tried out their invention on participants who drank alcohol, gargled mouthwash, and ate soup, and it was successfully able to recognize what the person had, Science Magazine reports. The hope is that the device will be able to help doctors and researchers alike to make connections between dietary intake and overall health.

People are struggling to find the bee in this Easter-themed puzzle — can you spot it? .
Artist Gergely Dudás created a colorful puzzle featuring a tiny hidden bee for Easter — and the internet is stumped.- Artist Gergely Dudás posted an Easter-themed one that his Facebook followers are loving.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!