Weekend Reads Recent cold snap can't be blamed on climate change, study finds

00:06  12 january  2018
00:06  12 january  2018 Source:   cbc.ca

Urban coyotes may be drawn to garbage, compost during cold snaps, says researcher

  Urban coyotes may be drawn to garbage, compost during cold snaps, says researcher Urban coyotes may be drawn to garbage, compost during cold snaps, says researcherEdmonton’s urban coyotes were probably as miserable as their human neighbours during the city’s recent cold snap, foraging for food in frigid temperatures and warding off frostbite.

Consider this cold comfort: A quick study of the brutal recent cold snap in Canada and the U.S. found that the Arctic blast really wasn't global warming but a freak of nature. Latest Technology & Science News Headlines. Recent deep freeze can ' t be blamed on climate change , study finds .

Last week the recent cold snap was because of 'global warming / climate change ', this week they have decided that it wasn' t caused by But they must blame all weather changes on anthropogenic global warming. If not, the plan to strip America’s wealth and bring us to our knees is doomed.

Recent cold snap can't be blamed on climate change, study finds © Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press Recent cold snap can't be blamed on climate change, study finds

Consider this cold comfort: A quick study of the brutal recent cold snap in Canada and the U.S. found that the Arctic blast really wasn't global warming but a freak of nature.

Frigid weather like the two-week cold spell that began around Christmas is 15 times rarer than it was a century ago, according to a team of international scientists who does real-time analyses to see if extreme weather events are natural or more likely to happen because of climate change.

The cold snap that gripped the East Coast and Midwest regions of the U.S. and much of Central and Eastern Canada was a rarity that bucks the warming trend, said researcher Claudia Tebaldi of the U.S.-based National Center for Atmospheric Research and the private organization Climate Central .

Canada's bitter weather has even penguins coming out of the cold

  Canada's bitter weather has even penguins coming out of the cold Just how cold is it in Canada? Ask the penguins at the Calgary zoo: Even they have had to take shelter. King penguins -- one of five species at the zoo in western Alberta province -- are certainly accustomed to chilly weather, more so than species like the Humboldt that prefer somewhat warmer climes, said zoo curator Malu Celli.

Climate change has made such cold spells less common and less intense, the group said. That finding agrees with earlier studies , said University of Georgia meteorology professor Marshall Shepherd, who wasn' t part of the study . "I think the public frenzy over the recent cold snap

Al Gore took to his Twitter account last week to blame the recent record cold snap on climate change . So let me get this straight, This cold is from climate change , Previous cold shots werent, Previous cold shots like 83-84 this period colder .

The same team had connected several weather events last year to man-made global warming including Hurricane Harvey that battered the U.S. and Caribbean and the French floods.

'Becoming stranger'

"It was very definitely strange, especially now," said study co-author Gabriel Vecchi of Princeton University. A century ago "it wouldn't have been that strange. Things like this are becoming stranger."

The study by the World Weather Attribution analyzed weather records dating back to 1880 and found the cold weather that hit a huge swath of North America tends to happen once every 250 years. In the early 1900s, it happened about once every 17 years. Climate change has made such cold spells less common and less intense, the group said.

Cover up — another deep freeze returns to Ottawa

  Cover up — another deep freeze returns to Ottawa Frostbite, extreme cold and windy, oh my! OK, it's not Oz but the cold may make us wish we could escape to another place this weekend. Since Thursday night, the region has been plunged into yet another cold snap. This one, fortunately, only lasting until Monday. Until then, take precautions against the cold. There is a frostbite warning in place and with the wind chill, it will feel like –30 and colder for most of the day and night. Environment Canada is keeping an  extreme cold warning  in place for the entire region until Sunday night and expect the frostbite warning to stay in place, too.

Al Gore blamed the recent bitter cold snap on climate change , but a famed meteorologist was there to chide him with facts. (Matthias Nareyek/Getty Images for Paramount Pictures).

7, 2018, file photo, fishing trawlers sit on the frozen harbor of Lake Montauk surrounded by thin sheets of ice in Montauk, N.Y. A quick study of the brutal American cold snap found that the Arctic blast really was a freak of nature. Climate change wasn’ t a factor but it is making such frigid weather spells much

That finding agrees with earlier studies, said University of Georgia meteorology professor Marshall Shepherd, who wasn't part of the study.

"I think the public frenzy over the recent cold snap illustrated that we are less acclimated to such events," he said in an email.

The study, based on observations and statistics, did not find evidence for a popular scientific theory that links melting Arctic sea ice to blasts of cold air escaping the top of the world .

The theory, which is still debated by scientists but gaining credence among many, is based on pressure changes and other factors that cause the jet stream to plunge and weather systems to get stuck. But the latest analysis didn't find such evidence.

Three scientists whose studies have connected Arctic warming to changes in extreme events disagree.

Because such atmospheric pressure changes happen occasionally, quick studies that rely on averages miss extreme events like the recent cold spell, said James Overland of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who supports the theory.

Rejoice! Toronto’s deep freeze is about to end

  Rejoice! Toronto’s deep freeze is about to end Almost two weeks have passed since Toronto was first gripped by extreme cold on Christmas Day. If you’re worried you’ll never feel warm again, don’t despair, this frozen nightmare will soon come to an end. Environment Canada said the cold snap will finally dissipate by Sunday afternoon, and “a much milder week is expected.” Nonetheless, the forecaster is urging GTA residents to keep their parkas around Sunday morning, as “an Arctic ridge of high pressure continues to bring cold temperatures and brisk northwesterly winds to Southern Ontario,” as well as wind chill temperatures as low as -35 C.

Climate change has made such cold spells less common and less intense, the group said. That finding agrees with earlier studies , said University of Georgia meteorology professor Marshall Shepherd, who wasn' t part of the study . "I think the public frenzy over the recent cold snap

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consider this cold comfort: A quick study of the brutal American cold snap found that the Arctic blast really wasn' t global warming but a freak of nature The Recent Articles. SHAKEDOWN: NYC mayor seeks billions from oil companies — blames them for ‘ climate change ’.

Related Video: Throwing Hot Water in Extreme Cold (Provided by The Weather Network)

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